Difference between revisions of "Scientific controversy"

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(New page: '''Scientific controversy''' when multiple scientists assert different viewpoints on a scientific matter. There is no particular method for resolving a scientific debate.)
 
(copying public domain text from NASA website and crediting the author of the passage, Ron Baalke)
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'''Scientific controversy''' when multiple scientists assert different viewpoints on a scientific matter. There is no particular method for resolving a [[scientific debate]].
 
'''Scientific controversy''' when multiple scientists assert different viewpoints on a scientific matter. There is no particular method for resolving a [[scientific debate]].
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The best known scientific controversy of modern times concerned the movement of planets in the nighttime sky. In 1610 [[Galileo]] used the newly invented [[telescope]] to observe [[Jupiter]] and discovered four smaller bodies revolving around it.
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Ron Baalke wrote:
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* Galileo first observed the moons of Jupiter on January 7, 1610 through a homemade telescope. He originally thought he saw three stars near Jupiter, strung out in a line through the planet. The next evening, these stars seemed to have moved the wrong way, which caught his attention. Galileo continued to observe the stars and Jupiter for the next week. On January 13, a fourth star appeared. After a few weeks, Galileo had observed that the four stars never left the vicinity of Jupiter and appeared to be carried along with the planet, and that they changed their position with respect to each other and Jupiter. Finally, Galileo determined that what he was observing were not stars, but planetary bodies that were in orbit around Jupiter. [http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/ganymede/discovery.html]

Revision as of 07:05, 17 December 2008

Scientific controversy when multiple scientists assert different viewpoints on a scientific matter. There is no particular method for resolving a scientific debate.

The best known scientific controversy of modern times concerned the movement of planets in the nighttime sky. In 1610 Galileo used the newly invented telescope to observe Jupiter and discovered four smaller bodies revolving around it.

Ron Baalke wrote:

  • Galileo first observed the moons of Jupiter on January 7, 1610 through a homemade telescope. He originally thought he saw three stars near Jupiter, strung out in a line through the planet. The next evening, these stars seemed to have moved the wrong way, which caught his attention. Galileo continued to observe the stars and Jupiter for the next week. On January 13, a fourth star appeared. After a few weeks, Galileo had observed that the four stars never left the vicinity of Jupiter and appeared to be carried along with the planet, and that they changed their position with respect to each other and Jupiter. Finally, Galileo determined that what he was observing were not stars, but planetary bodies that were in orbit around Jupiter. [1]