Difference between revisions of "Semele"

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In Greek mythology, Semele was the daughter of [[Cadmus]], the first king of [[Thebes]]
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In Greek mythology, '''Semele''' was the daughter of [[Cadmus]], the first king of [[Thebes]]
  
 
[[Zeus]] became enamoured of her and she soon became pregnant. Filled with jealousy, [[Hera]] appeared to her in the form of her nurse Beroe. She suggested that the lover of Semele was not really Zeus. Semele begged a favor from Zeus and he swore by the river [[Styx]], that he would grant it. She asked him to appear in the splendor of his full glory. Zeus sadly granted her request but she could not bear the sight and was immediately burned to ashes. Zeus rescued the fetus of her child [[Dionysus]] and held it in his thigh until its birth.
 
[[Zeus]] became enamoured of her and she soon became pregnant. Filled with jealousy, [[Hera]] appeared to her in the form of her nurse Beroe. She suggested that the lover of Semele was not really Zeus. Semele begged a favor from Zeus and he swore by the river [[Styx]], that he would grant it. She asked him to appear in the splendor of his full glory. Zeus sadly granted her request but she could not bear the sight and was immediately burned to ashes. Zeus rescued the fetus of her child [[Dionysus]] and held it in his thigh until its birth.

Revision as of 01:02, January 15, 2011

In Greek mythology, Semele was the daughter of Cadmus, the first king of Thebes

Zeus became enamoured of her and she soon became pregnant. Filled with jealousy, Hera appeared to her in the form of her nurse Beroe. She suggested that the lover of Semele was not really Zeus. Semele begged a favor from Zeus and he swore by the river Styx, that he would grant it. She asked him to appear in the splendor of his full glory. Zeus sadly granted her request but she could not bear the sight and was immediately burned to ashes. Zeus rescued the fetus of her child Dionysus and held it in his thigh until its birth.


References

  • Ovid. Metamorphoses.