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Homere Gaudin

29 bytes removed, 18 July
==Background==
A native of [[New Orleans]], Gaudin was reared in Covington in suburban St. Tammany Parish. Of [[France|French]] descent, he was named for his maternal grandfather, Homere Charles Grenier, Sr. (pronounced Grain YEY) (1862-1931).<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/34931220/homere-charles-grenier|title=Homere Charles Grenier, Sr. (maternal grandfather of Homere Gaudin)|publisher=Findagrave.com|accessdate=July 18, 2019}}</ref> His great-great-grandfather, John H. Illsey, served during [[Reconstruction]] as a justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court.<ref name=obit/>
His parents were Regis Bernard Gaudin (1903-1975) and the former Inez Catherine Grenier (1904-1951), who are entombed at St. Patrick Cemetery No. 3 in New Orleans. He was a maternal first cousin of [[John Grenier|John Edward Grenier]], a lawyer active in the 1964 [[Barry Goldwater]] presidential campaign and in the revitalization of the [[Republican Party]] in [[Alabama]].<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/148696853/inez-gaudin|title=Inez Catherine Grenier Gaudin|publisher=Findagrave.com|accessdatae=July 18, 2019}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/34931223/charles-desire-grenier|title=Charles Desire Grenier, Sr. (maternal uncle of. Homere Gaudin) (1893-1951)|publisher=Findagrave.com|accessdate=July 18, 2019}}</ref> He was a maternal nephew of Williamine "Wilhemina" Marie Grenier (1884-1969), mentioned in his obituary.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/34931224/williamine-marie-grenier|title=Williamine "Wilhemina" Marie Grenier (aunt of Homere Gaudin)|publisher=Findagrave.com|accessdate=July 18, 2019}}</ref>.
In 1947, Gaudin graduated from St. Paul's High School, a [[Roman Catholic]] all-male entity in Covington, at which he was named most valuable player in [[football]], all-state in [[basketball]], and also set records on four state championship track and field teams. He briefly attended [[Louisiana State University]] in [[Baton Rouge]], at which he was a member of the 1949 LSU Cinderella team and the 1950 Sugar Bowl team. He graduated with a [[Bachelor of Arts]] in English and history in 1952 from the University of Louisiana at [[Lafayette]], then known as Southwestern Louisiana Institute of Liberal and Technical Learning, renamed in 1960 as the University of Southwestern Louisiana. He lettered in three college sports at Southwestern and was named to the All-Gulf States Conference football team in 1951 after leading the conference in individual scoring and receiving<ref name=obit/>.
==Legal career==
In 1958, he received his [[Juris Doctor]]ate from Loyola College of Law in New Orleans, at which he was a moot court finalist, an editor of the university newspaper, ''The Maroon'', and a member of Delta Theta Phi national legal fraternity. He joined his paternal uncles, Felix and Hilary Gaudin in the practice of law.<ref name=obit>{{cite web|url=https://obits.nola.com/obituaries/nola/obituary.aspx?n=homere-charles-gaudin-charley&pid=193308874&fhid=5630|title=Homere Gaudin's Obituary|publisher=''New Orleans Times-Picayune''|date=July 4, 2019|accessdate=July 1718, 2019}}</ref>
In his obituary, his friends recalled Judge Gaudin as "gentle, gracious, and wise." People were said to have been drawn to "his inner calm, warm smile, and dry wit". While in law school and some time thereafter, Gaudin was a sports columnist for the former ''New Orleans States-Item.'' He was the legal counsel and vice president of the Louisiana Sportswriter's Association, which made him an honorary lifetime member. He was elected to Louisiana's 24th Judicial District Court in 1966, when at the age of thirty-six he became one of the youngest persons in the state to be elected to the bench. That same year, his cousin, John Grenier, was the unsuccessful Republican candidate for the [[U.S. Senate]] seat in Alabama against veteral lawmaker, [[John Sparkman]]. Gaudin sat on the district bench until 1982, during which time he served as Chief Judge, President of the 4th Circuit Judges Association, and on the executive committee of the Louisiana District Judges Association. In 1982, he was elected judge of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal for Louisiana (not the appointed federal court of the same name in New Orleans), with service until 1999. For part of his time on the appeals court, he was Chief Judge. He also sat by special appointment as an ad hoc judge of the Louisiana Supreme Court and on various circuit courts of appeal throughout the state.<ref name=obit/>
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