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Month

3,400 bytes added, 10:07, November 3, 2008
transfered text from [[months]]
#redirect There are 12 '''months''' in the current [[MonthsGregorian Calendar]], a practice started with the [[Romans]] in the [[Julian Calendar]]. They subdivide the year and are based loosely on the lunar cycles of the moon orbiting the earth (even though the moon orbits more than 12 times in a year). The months in order: {| class="wikitable"|-! Name! Days|-|January|31|-|-|February|28|-|-|March|31|-|-|April|30|-|-|May|31|-|-|June|30|-|-|July|31|-|-|August|31|-|-|September|30|-|-|October|31|-|-|November|30|-|-|December|31|-|} On [[leap year]]s, February will have 29 days instead of 28. A rhyme taught to children to remember the days of the month: :''Thirty days hath September'' :''April, June, and November'' :''All the rest have thirty-one'' :''Except for February alone'' :''Which has twenty-eight days clear'' :''And twenty-nine in each leap year '' ==January==Originally named after [[Janus]], the two-headed [[Mythology|Roman god]] of the New Year. One of his heads looks back to the previous year, and the other looks forward in anticipation of the coming year. [[New Year's Day]] and [[Martin Luther King Day]] are holidays that both occur during January. ==February==The word derives from the [[Latin]] "Februārius" (ménsis), meaning "expiatory" (month), derivative of "februa," meaning "expiatory offerings." It was named after the Roman purification or forgiveness festival. It is the shortest of the months. [[President's Day]] and [[Valentine's Day]] fall within February. ==March==Originally amed after the Roman god of war, [[Mars (Mythology)|Mars]]. During Roman era, it was the first month of the year, thus explaining the names of September, October, November and December (respectively seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth in Latin, referring to their former relatives positions in the Roman calendar). [[St. Patrick's Day]] occurs in March as does the famous reference to the [[Ides of March]], the death of [[Julius Caesar]]. [[Easter]] takes place in either March or April. ==April==From the Latin word aperire meaning "to open" as in flower buds. The first day of April is [[April Fools Day]]. Easter takes place in either March or April ==May==Named after the [[Norse]] goddess of the Earth, [[Maia]]. [[Mother's Day]] is in May. ==June==Was named for [[Juno]], the wife of [[Jupiter]] in Roman mythology. [[Father's Day]] is in June. ==July==Was named after [[Julius Caesar]], the famous Roman general and statesman who was the creator of the [[Julian Calendar]]. The [[Fourth of July]] is celebrated as the day of the [[United States]] independence from [[Great Britain]]. ==August==Was named after [[Augustus]] Caesar, the first Emperor of Rome. ==September==Literally means "seventh month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. [[Labor Day]] is in September. ==October==Literally means "eighth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. [[Halloween]] takes place on the last day of October. ==November==Literally means "ninth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. [[Thanksgiving]] takes place in November. ==December==Literally means "tenth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. [[Christmas]] takes place in December.  ==See Also==* [[Season]]s [[Category:Chronology]]
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