Difference between revisions of "Srinivasa Ramanujan"

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'''Srinivasa Ramanujan''' was an [[Indian]] [[mathematician]] who had many equational insights about [[number theory]]. These insights often did not come with proofs, and though many were true, many also turned out to be false.
 
'''Srinivasa Ramanujan''' was an [[Indian]] [[mathematician]] who had many equational insights about [[number theory]]. These insights often did not come with proofs, and though many were true, many also turned out to be false.
  
He claimed that he received some of these insights from [[Hindu]] gods in his dreams or in drops of blood.<ref>A Passion for Mathematics: Numbers, Puzzles, Madness, Religion, and the Quest for Reality
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He claimed that he received some of these insights from [[Hindu]] gods in his dreams or in drops of blood.<ref name="pickover">A Passion for Mathematics: Numbers, Puzzles, Madness, Religion, and the Quest for Reality
By Clifford A. Pickover</ref> Some Christians have criticized this, saying that such shallow (no proofs) insights, some of which were false prophecies, may very well have come from [[Satan]].<ref>ibid</ref>
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By Clifford A. Pickover</ref> Some Christians have criticized this, saying that such shallow (no proofs) insights, some of which were false prophecies, may very well have come from [[Satan]].<ref name="pickover" />
  
 
==Notes==
 
==Notes==

Revision as of 23:29, October 5, 2009

Srinivasa Ramanujan was an Indian mathematician who had many equational insights about number theory. These insights often did not come with proofs, and though many were true, many also turned out to be false.

He claimed that he received some of these insights from Hindu gods in his dreams or in drops of blood.[1] Some Christians have criticized this, saying that such shallow (no proofs) insights, some of which were false prophecies, may very well have come from Satan.[1]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 A Passion for Mathematics: Numbers, Puzzles, Madness, Religion, and the Quest for Reality By Clifford A. Pickover