Talk:Anglophile

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KyleDD, like I said on another page, I don't go in for messing around. So I'm not going to write an extensive justification of why I think the UK is a great country. Rule of law, freedom of speech, racial tolerance, standing up to the Nazis, standing up with the USA - those are all conservative virtues/actions. Think about it, then revert your own edits. I'm not going to be dragged into wasting time on lengthy Talk Page stuff. BenjyB 18:31, 6 August 2010 (EDT)

His edits reverted. Karajou 18:32, 6 August 2010 (EDT)
Seriously? BenjyB's edits are a whitewash. Anglophilia deals with excessive British pride and undue appreciation of all things British. KyleDD 18:34, 6 August 2010 (EDT)
"great admiration for England and things English" [1] One could say the same thing for "Ameriphilia" (love for American things); "Winophilia" (love for wines); "Harpoonophilia" (love for whaling); "Caponaphilia" (love for holiday massacres). What you are doing KyleDD is stamping down Anglophilia with a lot of the liberalism rampant in the UK. That by and of itself could be a separate article. Karajou 18:40, 6 August 2010 (EDT)
Thanks, Karajou. Yes, there's a big difference between appreciating the good things about the UK and being a liberal. BenjyB 18:53, 6 August 2010 (EDT)
I hear you. Thanks for the explanation. KyleDD 19:14, 6 August 2010 (EDT)

Slave trade

Sorry, ain't true. It was abolished 1833. With all due respect, Andy, I'm removing it. JDWpianist 10:23, 7 August 2010 (EDT)

Actually, the slave trade was abolished earlier, in 1807, and slavery was completely abolished in 1833 (see link above). Both of these are earlier than in the USA. JDWpianist 10:27, 7 August 2010 (EDT)
You're right. Thanks for the correction. We have open minds here and welcome corrections such as yours.--Andy Schlafly 20:08, 7 August 2010 (EDT)

NHS

Andy, Efficiency isn't the point at issue with the National Health Service. Not even the most patriotic Brit would claim the NHS is particularly efficient. What they value is its scope: everyone has access to health care at the point of need. I'm not going to change what you wrote because you get so defensive when anyone makes alterations to your writing. But you might want to reflect and choose a more appropriate phrase. BenjyB 17:10, 9 August 2010 (EDT)

Use metaphors and examples relating to a monarchy, such as references to "king" or "queen", or "majestic"

Quite amusing, especially in the Biblical context. I assume, Andy, you don't like Rev 17:14, perhaps you'd prefer "President of Presidents" over "King of Kings, Lord of Lords" --AugustO (talk) 15:31, 19 October 2015 (EDT)