Difference between revisions of "Talk:Denomination"

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(New page: I've never heard of "Oriental Orthodox" as a fourth accepted major designation of Christianity. If I am mistaken please feel free to correct (with some kind of indication of where the des...)
 
(Oriental Orthodox)
 
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I've never heard of "Oriental Orthodox" as a fourth accepted major designation of Christianity.  If I am mistaken please feel free to correct (with some kind of indication of where the designation comes from.) [[User:Learn together|Learn together]] 13:14, 14 January 2008 (EST)
 
I've never heard of "Oriental Orthodox" as a fourth accepted major designation of Christianity.  If I am mistaken please feel free to correct (with some kind of indication of where the designation comes from.) [[User:Learn together|Learn together]] 13:14, 14 January 2008 (EST)
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: ''Oriental Orthodox'' refers to the branch of Christianity that did not accept the Chalcedonian Creed, and includes the Coptic and Armenian churches. The schism occurred in 451, well before the Great Schism between Eastern and Western Christianity and so they don't belong to either of these branches. The Anglican and Assyrian traditions are also sometimes treated as major branches. Whether there are 2, 3, 4, or more major designations is a matter of opinion. [[User:Jalapeno|Jalapeno]] 15:20, 14 January 2008 (EST)

Latest revision as of 14:20, 14 January 2008

I've never heard of "Oriental Orthodox" as a fourth accepted major designation of Christianity. If I am mistaken please feel free to correct (with some kind of indication of where the designation comes from.) Learn together 13:14, 14 January 2008 (EST)

Oriental Orthodox refers to the branch of Christianity that did not accept the Chalcedonian Creed, and includes the Coptic and Armenian churches. The schism occurred in 451, well before the Great Schism between Eastern and Western Christianity and so they don't belong to either of these branches. The Anglican and Assyrian traditions are also sometimes treated as major branches. Whether there are 2, 3, 4, or more major designations is a matter of opinion. Jalapeno 15:20, 14 January 2008 (EST)