Difference between revisions of "Talk:Liberal trap"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(dimwit)
m
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 16: Line 16:
 
:::::I would call that a dimwitted question, having no apparent significance.  There are lots of very smart and productive people who do not read newspapers or magazines.  Perhaps you knew some among college professors, and there are certainly more now that the internet is a superior source of information.--[[User:Aschlafly|Andy Schlafly]] 15:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)
 
:::::I would call that a dimwitted question, having no apparent significance.  There are lots of very smart and productive people who do not read newspapers or magazines.  Perhaps you knew some among college professors, and there are certainly more now that the internet is a superior source of information.--[[User:Aschlafly|Andy Schlafly]] 15:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)
 
:::::: I suggest that keeping this anecdote in CP makes Palin look stupid. She [http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/09/30/eveningnews/main4490618.shtml answered that] she reads lots of them.[[User:RJJensen|RJJensen]] 15:55, 17 January 2010 (EST)
 
:::::: I suggest that keeping this anecdote in CP makes Palin look stupid. She [http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/09/30/eveningnews/main4490618.shtml answered that] she reads lots of them.[[User:RJJensen|RJJensen]] 15:55, 17 January 2010 (EST)
 +
 +
::::::: But the question is clearly a liberal trap.  If Palin says she reads newspapers, then the follow-up question is obviously going to be "which ones"???  Then she is expected by liberals to pay homage to the New York Times or Washington Post, which would hurt her among conservatives, and she would be ridiculed by liberals if she simply listed local papers.  The whole line of questioning is "dimwitted", because it has no real value except to spark baseless criticism.--[[User:Aschlafly|Andy Schlafly]] 16:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)

Revision as of 15:25, 17 January 2010

Well if it's dimwitted, any conservative can handle it. :) This is not a term in common usage. RJJensen 11:51, 17 January 2010 (EST)

Some lead (by coining or popularizing terms) some (like professors) follow. --ṬK/Admin/Talk 12:41, 17 January 2010 (EST)

It's often dimwitted, but not always so. And even the smartest person in the world can be deceived by a liberal trap if he's in a hurry or thinking about something else.

In response to the concern about whether it's in common usage, a quick search on Google turns up over 5600 links to the term. So it's out there.--Andy Schlafly 13:59, 17 January 2010 (EST)

I recommend dropping "dimwitted." --as in the Palin example, saying she fell into a dimwitted trap has CP making her look stupid. RJJensen 14:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)
I'm open-minded about this. But sometimes smart people are tripped up by dimwitted questions (liberal traps), simply because smart people are not used to being ambushed by such idiotic tactics. Presumably you've sat on doctoral review panels and found an intelligent candidate tripped up by a simple-minded, softball question that was unexpected.
The finest baseball hitters in the game have struck out on the change-up, and applying that observation to this context seems to add information and value.--Andy Schlafly 14:32, 17 January 2010 (EST)
In the Palin case, she was asked what newspapers and magazines she read. She was asked three times and did not name any. RJJensen 14:49, 17 January 2010 (EST)
I would call that a dimwitted question, having no apparent significance. There are lots of very smart and productive people who do not read newspapers or magazines. Perhaps you knew some among college professors, and there are certainly more now that the internet is a superior source of information.--Andy Schlafly 15:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)
I suggest that keeping this anecdote in CP makes Palin look stupid. She answered that she reads lots of them.RJJensen 15:55, 17 January 2010 (EST)
But the question is clearly a liberal trap. If Palin says she reads newspapers, then the follow-up question is obviously going to be "which ones"??? Then she is expected by liberals to pay homage to the New York Times or Washington Post, which would hurt her among conservatives, and she would be ridiculed by liberals if she simply listed local papers. The whole line of questioning is "dimwitted", because it has no real value except to spark baseless criticism.--Andy Schlafly 16:25, 17 January 2010 (EST)