Difference between revisions of "Taser"

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'''Tasers''' are stun guns used by the [[police]] to subdue [[suspect]]s.
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'''Tasers''' are stun guns used by the [[police]] to subdue suspects.
 
[[Image:Taser 468x342.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Policeman aiming a Taser Gun.]] The device shoots an electrode, attached by a wire to a battery, which delivers a powerful electric shock. The taser is used to subdue suspects who resist arrest, as well as for personal self-defense.  
 
[[Image:Taser 468x342.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Policeman aiming a Taser Gun.]] The device shoots an electrode, attached by a wire to a battery, which delivers a powerful electric shock. The taser is used to subdue suspects who resist arrest, as well as for personal self-defense.  
  
It is favored by people who want to subdue a suspect or assailant without killing him, but is opposed by some people and [[liberal]] groups (like [[Amnesty International]] and the [[ACLU]]). In rare cases, being shot with a taser has resulted in death. <ref>''The Trouble With Tasers - What The Manufacturer Doesn’t Want You To Know'' 7 March 2007 [http://www.crunchgear.com/2007/03/07/a-crunchgear-investigation-the-trouble-with-tasers-what-the-manufacturer-doesnt-want-you-to-know/ CrunchGear]. Accessed 5 January 2008.</ref>  These deaths are often attributed to [[excited delirium]], a heart condition related to illegal drug use (such as [[cocaine]] or [[methamphetamine]]) or [[mental illness]].  This attribution has been controversial, because "excited delirium" is almost never diagnosed outside of police custody.<ref>[http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15001627 Suspects' deaths blamed on 'excited delirium'] (Associated Press, Sept. 25, 2006</ref>
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It is favored by people who want to subdue a suspect or assailant without killing him, but is opposed by some people and [[liberal]] groups (like [[Amnesty International]] and the [[ACLU]]). In rare cases, being shot with a taser has resulted in death. <ref>''The Trouble With Tasers - What The Manufacturer Doesn’t Want You To Know'' 7 March 2007 [http://www.crunchgear.com/2007/03/07/a-crunchgear-investigation-the-trouble-with-tasers-what-the-manufacturer-doesnt-want-you-to-know/ CrunchGear]. Accessed 5 January 2008.</ref>  These deaths are often attributed to excited delirium, a [[heart]] condition related to illegal drug use (such as [[cocaine]] or [[methamphetamine]]) or [[mental illness]].  This attribution has been controversial, because "excited delirium" is almost never diagnosed outside of police custody.<ref>[http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15001627 Suspects' deaths blamed on 'excited delirium'] (Associated Press, Sept. 25, 2006</ref>
  
YouTube has some videos of young men resisting arrest, getting tasered, and then claiming the police used excessive force or abused their authority.  
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[[YouTube]] has some videos of young men resisting arrest, getting tasered, and then claiming the police used excessive force or abused their authority.  
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 20:03, 17 January 2008

Tasers are stun guns used by the police to subdue suspects.

Policeman aiming a Taser Gun.
The device shoots an electrode, attached by a wire to a battery, which delivers a powerful electric shock. The taser is used to subdue suspects who resist arrest, as well as for personal self-defense.

It is favored by people who want to subdue a suspect or assailant without killing him, but is opposed by some people and liberal groups (like Amnesty International and the ACLU). In rare cases, being shot with a taser has resulted in death. [1] These deaths are often attributed to excited delirium, a heart condition related to illegal drug use (such as cocaine or methamphetamine) or mental illness. This attribution has been controversial, because "excited delirium" is almost never diagnosed outside of police custody.[2]

YouTube has some videos of young men resisting arrest, getting tasered, and then claiming the police used excessive force or abused their authority.

References

  1. The Trouble With Tasers - What The Manufacturer Doesn’t Want You To Know 7 March 2007 CrunchGear. Accessed 5 January 2008.
  2. Suspects' deaths blamed on 'excited delirium' (Associated Press, Sept. 25, 2006

External Links