Difference between revisions of "The Exorcist"

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(But liberals disliked its disturbing depiction of the devil and its favorable characterization of Christianity, so it won only two minor Oscars: Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Sound.)
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'''''The Exorcist''''' is a movie first released in 1973, based on the 1971 novel by William Peter Blatty, which was based on the case of [[Robbie Mannheim]]. The novel and the movie depict a girl possessed by the [[devil]] and efforts at [[exorcism]] by a [[priest]] at the request of the girl's mother. It had several sequels, the first of whom (1977) featured the same player as the possessed girl from the first film.   
 
'''''The Exorcist''''' is a movie first released in 1973, based on the 1971 novel by William Peter Blatty, which was based on the case of [[Robbie Mannheim]]. The novel and the movie depict a girl possessed by the [[devil]] and efforts at [[exorcism]] by a [[priest]] at the request of the girl's mother. It had several sequels, the first of whom (1977) featured the same player as the possessed girl from the first film.   
  
The movie caused a national sensation in the [[United States]].  It broke the record for the biggest grossing movie of all time, and was nominated for ten [[Academy Award]]s.  But its depiction of possession by the [[devil]] was controversial, and it won only two: Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Sound.<ref>http://www.filmsite.org/exor.html</ref>
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The movie caused a national sensation in the [[United States]].  It broke the record for the biggest grossing movie of all time, and was nominated for ten [[Academy Award]]s.  But [[liberal]]s disliked its disturbing depiction of the [[devil]] and its favorable characterization of [[Christianity]], so it won only two minor Oscars: Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Sound.<ref>http://www.filmsite.org/exor.html</ref>
  
In the [[United Kingdom]] the film was banned from cinema, television and video release from 1984 to 1998, due to its disturbing themes and content.
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In the more [[atheist]]ic [[United Kingdom]], this film was banned from cinema, television and video release from 1984 to 1998, due to its disturbing themes and content.
  
 
It was re-released in 2000 with the original edited scenes reinstated.
 
It was re-released in 2000 with the original edited scenes reinstated.
  
The movie was filmed in [[Georgetown]] and includes many scenes that have since become famous.  The film's depiction of [[Christianity]] is more respectful than in most modern films.
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The movie was filmed in [[Georgetown]] and includes many scenes that have since become famous.  The film's depiction of the [[Roman Catholic Church]] is more respectful than in most modern films.
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==

Revision as of 16:04, 11 March 2018

The Exorcist is a movie first released in 1973, based on the 1971 novel by William Peter Blatty, which was based on the case of Robbie Mannheim. The novel and the movie depict a girl possessed by the devil and efforts at exorcism by a priest at the request of the girl's mother. It had several sequels, the first of whom (1977) featured the same player as the possessed girl from the first film.

The movie caused a national sensation in the United States. It broke the record for the biggest grossing movie of all time, and was nominated for ten Academy Awards. But liberals disliked its disturbing depiction of the devil and its favorable characterization of Christianity, so it won only two minor Oscars: Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Sound.[1]

In the more atheistic United Kingdom, this film was banned from cinema, television and video release from 1984 to 1998, due to its disturbing themes and content.

It was re-released in 2000 with the original edited scenes reinstated.

The movie was filmed in Georgetown and includes many scenes that have since become famous. The film's depiction of the Roman Catholic Church is more respectful than in most modern films.

References

  1. http://www.filmsite.org/exor.html

See also