Difference between revisions of "Tides"

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(As the sun rises in the east and the stars come out at night, we are confident that the ocean waters will regularly rise and fall along our shores.)
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'''Tides''' on the [[Earth]] result from the [[Moon]]'s gravity, which is just enough stronger on the near side of the earth to attract ocean water more than on the far side. Fishermen, sailors and other observers have long noted that the twice-daily cycle of high tides and low tides is corresponds to the moon's orbit.
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'''Tides''' are one of the most reliable phenomena in the world. As the sun rises in the east and the stars come out at night, we are confident that the ocean waters will regularly rise and fall along our shores. [http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/tides/tides01_intro.html]
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Tides on the [[Earth]] result from the [[Moon]]'s gravity, which is just enough stronger on the near side of the earth to attract ocean water more than on the far side. Fishermen, sailors and other observers have long noted that the twice-daily cycle of high tides and low tides is corresponds to the moon's orbit.
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
 
*[[tidal coupling]]
 
*[[tidal coupling]]
 
*[[gravitational locking]]
 
*[[gravitational locking]]

Revision as of 13:44, December 16, 2007

Tides are one of the most reliable phenomena in the world. As the sun rises in the east and the stars come out at night, we are confident that the ocean waters will regularly rise and fall along our shores. [1]

Tides on the Earth result from the Moon's gravity, which is just enough stronger on the near side of the earth to attract ocean water more than on the far side. Fishermen, sailors and other observers have long noted that the twice-daily cycle of high tides and low tides is corresponds to the moon's orbit.

See also