Difference between revisions of "Turner v. Bank of North America"

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''Turner v. Bank of North America'', 4 U.S. 8 (1799), is a [[U.S. Supreme Court]] decision that includes the classic statement of the power of Congress to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts:
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''Turner v. Bank of North America'', 4 U.S. 8 (1799), is a [[U.S. Supreme Court]] decision that includes the classic statement of the power of [[Congress]] to limit the jurisdiction of the [[federal]] courts:
  
 
:The notion has frequently been entertained, that the federal courts derive their judicial power immediately from the Constitution; but the political truth is, that the disposal of the judicial power (except in a few specified instances) belongs to Congress. If Congress has given the power to this Court, we possess it, not otherwise; and if Congress has not given the power to us, or to any other Court, it still remains at the legislative disposal.
 
:The notion has frequently been entertained, that the federal courts derive their judicial power immediately from the Constitution; but the political truth is, that the disposal of the judicial power (except in a few specified instances) belongs to Congress. If Congress has given the power to this Court, we possess it, not otherwise; and if Congress has not given the power to us, or to any other Court, it still remains at the legislative disposal.

Revision as of 17:30, 24 August 2007

Turner v. Bank of North America, 4 U.S. 8 (1799), is a U.S. Supreme Court decision that includes the classic statement of the power of Congress to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts:

The notion has frequently been entertained, that the federal courts derive their judicial power immediately from the Constitution; but the political truth is, that the disposal of the judicial power (except in a few specified instances) belongs to Congress. If Congress has given the power to this Court, we possess it, not otherwise; and if Congress has not given the power to us, or to any other Court, it still remains at the legislative disposal.