Difference between revisions of "Uranium-lead dating"

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Uranium-lead dating has been used to place a date of 252.6 million years ago on the end of the [[Permian|Permian period]] and the beginning of the [[Triassic|Triassic period]] with a margin of error much smaller than other dating methods had given.<ref>http://www.physorg.com/news1197.html</ref>  
 
Uranium-lead dating has been used to place a date of 252.6 million years ago on the end of the [[Permian|Permian period]] and the beginning of the [[Triassic|Triassic period]] with a margin of error much smaller than other dating methods had given.<ref>http://www.physorg.com/news1197.html</ref>  
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Creation Scientists have pointed out that Uranium-lead dating relies heavily on the assumption that the laws of physics have not changed in the past. There are many evidences to suggest that God may have sped up the rate of uranium decay in the first few days of creation.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
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[[Category:Geology]]
 
[[Category:Geology]]

Revision as of 18:44, 1 November 2010

Uranium-lead dating is one of several radiometric dating techniques. It is the oldest method and generally considered to be the most accurate. It dates a material based on the half-lives for the decay of U238 to Pb206 or of U235 to Pb207. [1]

This dating method is used on several minerals, however, it works best with the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4). Because the formation of zircon rejects lead from its structure but allows uranium in the place of zirconium atoms, any lead present in it's structure must be radiogenic. Given the amount of radiogenic lead and uranium in a sample, the age of the crystal can be determined. Zircon is also preferred for its high toughness and ease of separation from other rocks.

Uranium-lead dating has been used to place a date of 252.6 million years ago on the end of the Permian period and the beginning of the Triassic period with a margin of error much smaller than other dating methods had given.[2]

Creation Scientists have pointed out that Uranium-lead dating relies heavily on the assumption that the laws of physics have not changed in the past. There are many evidences to suggest that God may have sped up the rate of uranium decay in the first few days of creation.

References

  1. http://geology.about.com/od/geotime_dating/a/uraniumlead.htm
  2. http://www.physorg.com/news1197.html