Difference between revisions of "User talk:SaraT"

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m (Put the book in context.)
(reply to exam)
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MAJOR nit on question 59:  Solving encrypted messages by checking letter frequencies is the stuff of puzzles in popular magazines and children's books.  The Enigma cipher was '''much''' more difficult than that.  The rotors advanced, completely changing the permutation, after every letter.  Solving the Enigma cipher required the concentrated effort of the best minds of the British mathematics community.  See "Alan Turing: The Enigma" by Andrew Hodges for a readable, but not ''too'' technical account, of the problem and the way it was attacked.
 
MAJOR nit on question 59:  Solving encrypted messages by checking letter frequencies is the stuff of puzzles in popular magazines and children's books.  The Enigma cipher was '''much''' more difficult than that.  The rotors advanced, completely changing the permutation, after every letter.  Solving the Enigma cipher required the concentrated effort of the best minds of the British mathematics community.  See "Alan Turing: The Enigma" by Andrew Hodges for a readable, but not ''too'' technical account, of the problem and the way it was attacked.
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: I don't know if I'll bother grading your exam, because you defiantly answered both the boys and girls extra credit question.  You're not both.
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: Your "minor nit on question 53" is wrong.  See [http://www.magnacharta.org/]
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: Your "major nit on question 59" is also wrong.  British mathematicians did not crack the Enigma; Polish mathematicians did, and part of the decrypting was based on letter frequency.  Godspeed.--[[User:Aschlafly|Andy Schlafly]] 22:04, 4 June 2009 (EDT)

Revision as of 21:04, 4 June 2009

The 1300s did not occur after the King James Bible, and hence my reversion. You might try taking World History Final Exam.--Andy Schlafly 16:16, 3 June 2009 (EDT)

Oh, sorry. I didn't read the fine print "developed since the King James Version". That explains a bunch of conservative words that I found surprisingly absent, like "work" and "decency". I'll be more selective and careful in the future.
My KJV doesn't show a date in the dedication, which sort of surprised me. But I knew it was during the reign of James I, in the early 1600's. I didn't know, until just now, that it was 1611.
The Final Exam question you are referring to was 40, right? Answer is B of course. I'll look at the exam in more detail soon. I've just finished taking some other exams. SaraT 17:47, 3 June 2009 (EDT)

Here are my answers to the World History Final Exam:

1 c 11 b 21 b 31 d 41 d 51 c
2 d 12 b 22 d 32 d 42 c 52 b
3 a 13 a 23 b 33 b 43 b 53 a
4 c 14 c 24 b 34 c 44 b 54 d
5 d 15 e 25 b 35 d 45 e 55 b
6 a 16 e 26 d 36 b 46 e 56 e
7 b 17 d 27 b 37 a 47 d 57 d
8 a 18 c 28 e 38 c 48 c 58 b
9 c 19 b 29 c 39 e 49 b 59 c
10 b 20 d 30 d 40 b 50 d 60 a
EC d for boys, e for girls

Minor nit on question 53: It's Carta, not Charta.

MAJOR nit on question 59: Solving encrypted messages by checking letter frequencies is the stuff of puzzles in popular magazines and children's books. The Enigma cipher was much more difficult than that. The rotors advanced, completely changing the permutation, after every letter. Solving the Enigma cipher required the concentrated effort of the best minds of the British mathematics community. See "Alan Turing: The Enigma" by Andrew Hodges for a readable, but not too technical account, of the problem and the way it was attacked.

I don't know if I'll bother grading your exam, because you defiantly answered both the boys and girls extra credit question. You're not both.
Your "minor nit on question 53" is wrong. See [1]
Your "major nit on question 59" is also wrong. British mathematicians did not crack the Enigma; Polish mathematicians did, and part of the decrypting was based on letter frequency. Godspeed.--Andy Schlafly 22:04, 4 June 2009 (EDT)