Difference between revisions of "Woody Allen"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Scandal)
Line 1: Line 1:
[[Image:Woody_Allen.jpg|thumb|200px|Woody Allen is a three time Academy Award winner]]
+
[[Image:Woody_Allen.jpg|thumb|200px|Woody Allen seduced his adolescent stepdaughter]]
 
'''Woody Allen''' (1935 - ) was born in [[Brooklyn]], [[New York]]. He is a former stand-up [[comedian]], and currently an acclaimed [[writer]], [[director]] and [[actor]]. He now lives in [[Manhattan]].  Best known for his offbeat and often self-deprecating comedies, Allen produced his most popular films in the 1970s, most notably ''Annie Hall'', which set a mold for romantic comedies that others would try to emulate.  His work in the 80s and 90s changed to darker comedies.  Whether because of the scandal he caused in the 1990s (see below) or the natural ebb and flow of movie making creativity and what is popular, Allen has not had a hit in many years.  Allen has continued to write and direct movies, however, but his view of the quality of his work does not match the general box office.  He considers his 2005 movie ''Match Point'' to be one of his best.
 
'''Woody Allen''' (1935 - ) was born in [[Brooklyn]], [[New York]]. He is a former stand-up [[comedian]], and currently an acclaimed [[writer]], [[director]] and [[actor]]. He now lives in [[Manhattan]].  Best known for his offbeat and often self-deprecating comedies, Allen produced his most popular films in the 1970s, most notably ''Annie Hall'', which set a mold for romantic comedies that others would try to emulate.  His work in the 80s and 90s changed to darker comedies.  Whether because of the scandal he caused in the 1990s (see below) or the natural ebb and flow of movie making creativity and what is popular, Allen has not had a hit in many years.  Allen has continued to write and direct movies, however, but his view of the quality of his work does not match the general box office.  He considers his 2005 movie ''Match Point'' to be one of his best.
  

Revision as of 11:12, 25 July 2008

Woody Allen seduced his adolescent stepdaughter

Woody Allen (1935 - ) was born in Brooklyn, New York. He is a former stand-up comedian, and currently an acclaimed writer, director and actor. He now lives in Manhattan. Best known for his offbeat and often self-deprecating comedies, Allen produced his most popular films in the 1970s, most notably Annie Hall, which set a mold for romantic comedies that others would try to emulate. His work in the 80s and 90s changed to darker comedies. Whether because of the scandal he caused in the 1990s (see below) or the natural ebb and flow of movie making creativity and what is popular, Allen has not had a hit in many years. Allen has continued to write and direct movies, however, but his view of the quality of his work does not match the general box office. He considers his 2005 movie Match Point to be one of his best.

Career overview

  • Allen directed 14 different actors in performances that went on to be Academy Award nominated: Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton, Mariel Hemingway, Michael Caine, Dianne Wiest, Martin Landau, Judy Davis, Chazz Palminteri, Jennifer Tilly, Mira Sorvino, Sean Penn, Samantha Morton and himself. Keaton, Caine, Wiest and Sorvino won Oscars for their performances in his movies.
  • He made 13 movies in which he cast Mia Farrow: Broadway Danny Rose (1984), Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), Alice (1990), Another Woman (1988), The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), September (1987), Husbands and Wives (1992), A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy (1982), New York Stories (1989), Radio Days (1987), Shadows and Fog (1992) and Zelig (1983).

Personal/Family Life

  • Allen married his first wife Harlene Rosen in 1956; they were divorced six years later.
  • His second marriage was to the noted actress Louise Lasser in 1966, and they divorced after five years.
  • He had a long-term relationship with actress Mia Farrow, from 1980 to 1992; the couple had one child.
  • He married Soon-Yi Previn in 1997, and the couple have two children.

Moral depravity of Woody Allen

In 1992 Allen's moral depravity was revealed when when Farrow discovered nude photographs taken by him of her 16-year-old adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn, whom he had seduced. In 1997, Previn, then 22, and Allen, 57, were married. Allen said, regarding his betrayal of his marriage vows, his cruel treatment of his wife, and his seduction of an adolescent female, "It was just one of those fortuitous events, one of the great pieces of luck in my life."[1] According to Farrow's biography, What Falls Away, Frank Sinatra (her former husband) offered to have Allen's legs broken when the affair with Previn was discovered.[2]

Filmography

Director

  • "What's Up, Tiger Lily?" (1966)
  • "Take the Money and Run" (1969)
  • "Bananas" (1971)
  • "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex" (1972)
  • "Sleeper" (1973)
  • "Love and Death" (1975)
  • "Annie Hall" (1977) (Oscar, best director)
  • "Interiors" (1978) (Oscar nomination, best director)
  • "Manhattan" (1979)
  • "Stardust Memories" (1980)
  • "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy" (1982)
  • "Zelig" (1983)
  • "Broadway Danny Rose" (1984) (Oscar nomination, best director)
  • "The Purple Rose of Cairo" (1985)
  • "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986) (Oscar nomination, best director)
  • "September" (1987)
  • "Radio Days" (1987)
  • "Another Woman" (1988)
  • "New York Stories" (1989)
  • "Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989) (Oscar nomination, best director)
  • "Alice" (1990)
  • "Shadow and Fog" (1992)
  • "Husbands and Wives" (1992)
  • "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1992)
  • "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994) (Oscar nomination, best director)
  • "Mighty Aphrodite" (1995)
  • "Everyone Says I Love You" (1997)
  • "Deconstructing Harry" (1997)
  • "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999)
  • "Small Time Crooks" (2000)
  • "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion" (2001)
  • "Hollywood Ending" (2002)
  • "Anything Else" (2003)

Actor

  • "That Was the Week That Was" (1964)
  • "What's New, Pussycat" (1965)
  • "What's Up, Tiger Lily?" (1966)
  • "Casino Royale" (1967)
  • "Take the Money and Run" (1969)
  • "Bananas" (1971)
  • "Play It Again, Sam" (1972)
  • "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex" (1972)
  • "Sleeper" (1973)
  • "Love and Death" (1975)
  • "The Front" (1976)
  • "Annie Hall" (1977) (Oscar nomination, best actor)
  • "Manhattan" (1979)
  • "Stardust Memories" (1980)
  • "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy" (1982)
  • "Zelig" (1983)
  • "Broadway Danny Rose" (1984)
  • "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986)
  • "King Lear" (1987)
  • "Radio Days" (1987)
  • "Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989)
  • "New York Stories" (1989)
  • "Scenes From a Mall" (1991)
  • "Husbands and Wives" (1992)
  • "Shadows and Fog" (1992)
  • "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1993)
  • "Don't Drink the Water" (1994)
  • "Mighty Aphrodite" (1995)
  • "Everyone Says I Love You" (1997)
  • "Deconstructing Harry" (1997)
  • "Wild Man Blues" (1998)
  • "Antz" (1998) (voice)
  • "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999)
  • "Picking Up the Pieces" (2000)
  • "Small Time Crooks" (2000)
  • "Company Man" (2000)
  • "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion" (2001)
  • "Hollywood Ending" (2002)
  • "Anything Else" (2003)</small>

Writer

  • "The Laugmaker" (1962)
  • "What's New, Pussycat" (1965)
  • "What's Up, Tiger Lily?" (1966)
  • "Take the Money and Run" (1969)
  • "Don't Drink the Water" (1969)
  • "Bananas" (1971)
  • "Play It Again, Sam" (1972)
  • "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex" (1972)
  • "Sleeper" (1973)
  • "Love and Death" (1975)
  • "Annie Hall" (1977) (Oscar, best original screenplay)
  • "Interiors" (1978) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Manhattan" (1979) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Stardust Memories" (1980)
  • "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy" (1982)
  • "Zelig" (1983)
  • "Broadway Danny Rose" (1984) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "The Purple Rose of Cairo" (1985) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986) (Oscar, best original screenplay)
  • "September" (1987)
  • "Radio Days" (1987) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Another Woman" (1988)
  • "New York Stories" (1989)
  • "Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Alice" (1990) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Shadows and Fog" (1992)
  • "Husbands and Wives" (1992) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1993)
  • "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Mighty Aphrodite" (1995) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay)
  • "Everyone Says I Love You" (1997)
  • "Deconstructing Harry" (1997) (Oscar nomination, best original screenplay) "Celebrity" (1998)
  • "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999)
  • "Small Time Crooks" (2000)
  • "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion" (2001)
  • "Hollywood Ending" (2002)
  • "Anything Else" (2003)

See also

External Links

References

  1. Vanity Fair Online, Dec 2005
  2. Internet Movie Database [1]