Difference between revisions of "Russian language"

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It is written in the [[Cyrillic alphabet]].
 
It is written in the [[Cyrillic alphabet]].
  
In the Russian present [[tense]], "to be" is not conjugated, and there are no articles (a, an, the), which means that the understanding of a [[noun]] as a determinant or indeterminant noun is based on context (I.e. "This is a cat" is literally translated to "This cat").  Though a word "to be" does exist, it is used for more subtle contexts as in "Understanding existence has always been a problem for philosophers", and the past and future tenses.   
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In the Russian present [[tense]], "to be" is not conjugated, and there are no [[article (grammar)|articles]] (a, an, the), which means that the understanding of a [[noun]] as a determinant or indeterminant noun is based on context (I.e. "This is a cat" is literally translated to "This cat").  Though a word "to be" does exist, it is used for more subtle contexts as in "Understanding existence has always been a problem for philosophers", and the past and future tenses.   
  
 
Every noun and [[adjective]] can be declined in 6 [[grammatical case|cases]]: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, prepositional (locative) and instrumental; both in the singular and plural.  Because of this freedom, [[word order]] is not very important to the speaker, and he or she is able to use word order to make subtle distinctions in tone, in importance, or in relevance.  
 
Every noun and [[adjective]] can be declined in 6 [[grammatical case|cases]]: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, prepositional (locative) and instrumental; both in the singular and plural.  Because of this freedom, [[word order]] is not very important to the speaker, and he or she is able to use word order to make subtle distinctions in tone, in importance, or in relevance.  

Revision as of 07:14, 27 June 2011

Russian (Русский язык; Russkiy yazyk) is a Slavic language spoken in Russia and the former Soviet republics. It is spoken by over 200 million people worldwide.

It is written in the Cyrillic alphabet.

In the Russian present tense, "to be" is not conjugated, and there are no articles (a, an, the), which means that the understanding of a noun as a determinant or indeterminant noun is based on context (I.e. "This is a cat" is literally translated to "This cat"). Though a word "to be" does exist, it is used for more subtle contexts as in "Understanding existence has always been a problem for philosophers", and the past and future tenses.

Every noun and adjective can be declined in 6 cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, prepositional (locative) and instrumental; both in the singular and plural. Because of this freedom, word order is not very important to the speaker, and he or she is able to use word order to make subtle distinctions in tone, in importance, or in relevance.

Verbs are conjugated in the present, past and future tenses, in the indicative, subjunctive and imperative moods. All verbs have at least two forms (one in the imperfective aspect and another in the perfective) to reflect the perceived completion of the action; verbs of motion can have two imperfective forms, one having a habitual meaning and one having a progressive meaning.

Examples:

  • Здравствуйте! (zdrastvwiche) = formal, pleasure to meet you
  • Привет! (Privyet)= Hello, Hi (between friends).
  • Как поживаете? (Kahk paživayete) = How are you?
  • Как вас зовут? (Kahk vas zavut) = literally "how do they call you" = What's your name?
  • Меня зовут Иван. (Menya zavut Eevan) = My name is Ivan. (literally - they call me, Ivan)