User:JoshuaB/USA vs CSA Constitutions

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This is a draft of an essay that will compare the Constitutions of the United States of America with the Confederate States of America.

Contents

Preamble

Text that appears in BLUE is text that has been changed from the original United States Constitution.
Text that appears is RED is text that has been removed from the original United States Constitution.
Text that appears in GREEN is new text added to the Confederate Constitution.

USA CSA Analysis
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. We, the people of the Confederate States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character, in order to form a permanent federal government, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity — invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God — do ordain and establish this Constitution for the Confederate States of America. The CSA preamble removes the idealist goal of creating a "more perfect union", and replaces it with text simply establishing a federal government. The CSA preamble also strikes references to collectivism such as "common defense" and the unspecific "general welfare" clause. The CSA does make the effort to specifically invoke God, thus arguably founding the CSA as a Christian nation.

Article I

Section 1

USA CSA Analysis
All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. All legislative powers herein delegated shall be vested in a Congress of the Confederate States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. The CSA made the minor change of replacing the word "granted" with "delegated".

Section 2

USA CSA Analysis
The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.


No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.


Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six,Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three.


When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.


The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

(1) The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several States; and the electors in each State shall be citizens of the Confederate States, and have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State Legislature; but no person of foreign birth, not a citizen of the Confederate States, shall be allowed to vote for any officer, civil or political, State or Federal.


(2) No person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained the age of twenty-five years, and be a citizen of the Confederate States, and who shall not when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.


(3) Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States, which may be included within this Confederacy, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all slaves. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the Confederate States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every fifty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of South Carolina shall be entitled to choose six; the State of Georgia ten; the State of Alabama nine; the State of Florida two; the State of Mississippi seven; the State of Louisiana six; and the State of Texas six.


(4) When vacancies happen in the representation from any State the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies.


(5) The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment; except that any judicial or other Federal officer, resident and acting solely within the limits of any State, may be impeached by a vote of two-thirds of both branches of the Legislature thereof.

1. The CSA added language that specifically restricted voting to legal citizens. While under the United States Constitution each state sets voter eligibility standards.


2. Minor change.


3. Changes to this section specifically mentions slaves by name, instead of by euphemism. Changes were also made to the number of citizens each member of congress would represent, which would have resulted in a much smaller body of congress. Of course member states were subtracted and added as necessary.


4. No changes.


5. This is the first major addition to the Confederate Constitution as it gives the states the right to impeach federally appointed court judges and other federally appointed state offices. This would make activist federal judges more responsive to the constituents they presided over.

Section 3

Section 4

Section 5

Section 6

Section 7

Section 8

Section 9

Section 10

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