Delta Kappa Epsilon

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Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or "Deke") is one of the oldest North American fraternities, with 55 active chapters across the United States and Canada. The fraternity was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 sophomores that were disaffected by the existing houses on campus. They established a fellowship "where the candidate most favored was he who combined in the most equal proportions the gentleman, the scholar, and the jolly good fellow." Its official motton is: Kerothen Philoi Aei

The Objects of Delta Kappa Epsilon are:

The Cultivation of General Literature and Social Culture, the Advancement and Encouragement of Intellectual Excellence, the Promotion of Honorable Friendship and Useful Citizenship, the Development of a Spirit of Tolerance and Respect for the Rights and Views of Others, the Maintenance of Gentlemanly Dignity, Self-Respect, and Morality in All Circumstances, and the Union of Stout Hearts and Kindred Interests to Secure to Merit its Due Reward.[1]

Prominent Dekes include: Rutherford B. Hayes, Theodore Roosevelt, Gerald R. Ford, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, Dan Quayle, Mark Dayton Governor of Minnesota, and Senator Ted Stevens.[2]

References

  1. http://dke.org/site/about_dke/objects.php
  2. https://dke.org/presidents/