Japan and alcoholism

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According to a Japan Times article on Japan's drinking problem, "alcohol is glorified for being an integral part of Japanese culture."[1]

In 2014, Japan Times reported in an article entitled Dealing with addiction: Japan’s drinking problem:

...alcohol is glorified for being an integral part of Japanese culture.

Indeed, the country’s liberal attitude toward drinking means that alcohol can be found almost anywhere at any time of day. It is not uncommon to see salarymen passed out on benches, women swaying from side to side on their walk home or piles of vomit (jokingly called “platform pizza”) at train stations.[2]

The 2012 article On Drinking Too Much in Japan declares:

Japanese researchers suggest that there are 2.4 million alcoholics in Japan, and that only 22,000 of them are seeking treatment...

According to one study:

“Sixty percent of problem drinkers are salaried businessmen who claim that getting drunk with clients or coworkers is part of their job and a mark of company loyalty. To refuse a drink from the boss is a terrible insult that can damage a career. And although alcohol consumption is now decreasing in most industrialized countries, it has quadrupled in Japan since 1960.”

The typical Japanese person consumes 6.5 liters of alcohol per year. The typical Japanese person also contains about 6.5 liters of blood...

Japan is sixth in the world for beer consumption...[3]

See also

References

  1. Dealing with addiction: Japan’s drinking problem, Japan Times, August 30, 2014
  2. Dealing with addiction: Japan’s drinking problem, Japan Times, August 30, 2014
  3. On Drinking Too Much in Japan