Laurence J. Kotlikoff

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Laurence J. ("Larry") Kotlikoff is an American economist and deficit hawk, perhaps best known for his pioneering work on intergenerational wealth transfers and its consequent iniquities. The author of Generational Accounting: Knowing Who Pays, and When, for What We Spend[1] (Free Press, New York, 1992; 261 pages), he has long been a frequent guest on his great friend Glenn Loury's The Glenn Show.

Research

Kotlikoff acted as consultant to the three researchers who, applying his method in the aftermath of the c.2008 financial crisis, authored the 2011 IMF working paper finding that, caeteris paribus, the US would need to upscale taxation rates[2] by a phenomenal 35% across the board to level its inter-generational playing field. As of end 2021, Kotlikoff's ten most cited works (source: <https://research.com>) listed in chronological order, were:

  • "The Role of Intergenerational Transfers in Aggregate Capital Accumulation" by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Lawrence H. Summers in the Journal of Political Economy (1981, 1616 Citations).
  • "The Family as an Incomplete Annuities Market" by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Avia Spivak in the Journal of Political Economy (1981, 1104 Citations).
  • "Dynamic fiscal policy" (Cambridge University Press, 1987; 224 pages) by Alan J Auerbach and Laurence J Kotlikoff (4090 Citations).
  • "Intergenerational Transfers and Savings" Laurence J. Kotlikoff in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (1988, 648 Citations).
  • "Generational Accounts - A Meaningful Alternative to Deficit Accounting" by Alan J. Auerbach, Jagadeesh Gokhale and Laurence J. Kotlikoff in Tax Policy and the Economy (1991, 953 Citations).
  • "Is the Extended Family Altruistically Linked? Direct Tests Using Micro Data" by Joseph G. Altonji, Fumio Hayashi and Laurence J. Kotlikoff in The American Economic Review (1992, 971 Citations).
  • "Generational Accounting: A Meaningful Way to Evaluate Fiscal Policy" by Alan J. Auerbach, Jagadeesh Gokhale and Laurence J. Kotlikoff in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (1994, 767 Citations).
  • "Risk-sharing between and within families" Fumio Hayashi, Joseph Altonji and Laurence Kotlikoff in Econometrica (1996, 470 Citations).
  • "Parental Altruism and Inter Vivos Transfers: Theory and Evidence" by Joseph G. Altonji, Fumio Hayashi and Laurence J. Kotlikoff in the Journal of Political Economy (1997, 918 Citations).
  • "Simulating Fundamental Tax Reform in the United States" by David Altig, Alan J. Auerbach, Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Kent A. Smetters in The American Economic Review (2001, 716 Citations).

References

  1. https://static.cambridge.org/content/id/urn%3Acambridge.org%3Aid%3Aarticle%3AS0143814X00005742/resource/name/firstPage-S0143814X00005742a.jpg
  2. NB: ie as distinct from raising rates by 35%: if you raise a 20% rate by 35% you get 55%, but if you upscale 20% by 35% you only get 27%, thank God. Although 27% sounds bad enough to me :-( -S ~~~

External links