Last modified on July 20, 2021, at 18:34

Alan Simpson

Alan Kooi Simpson


In office
January 1, 1979 – January 3, 1997
Preceded by Clifford Hansen
Succeeded by Mike Enzi

Senate Majority Whip
In office
January 3, 1985 – January 3, 1987
Leader Bob Dole
Preceded by Ted Stevens
Succeeded by Alan Cranston

Senate Minority Whip
In office
January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1995
Leader Bob Dole
Preceded by Alan Cranston
Succeeded by Wendell Ford (Kentucky)

Co-Chairman with Erskine Bowles (North Carolina) of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform
In office
February 18, 2010 – December 1, 2010

Wyoming State Representative for Park County
In office
January 1, 1965 – January1, 1977

Born September 2, 1931
Denver, Colorado.
Died American
Political party Republican
Relations Milward Simpson (father)
Peter K. Simpson (brother)
Children Three children, including

Colin M. Simpson (former state representative)

Alma mater University of Wyoming at Laramie (BA and JD)
Occupation Attorney
Religion Episcopalian

Military Service
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1954–1956
Rank Second Lieutenant
Unit 5th Infantry Regiment

2nd Armored Division

Alan Kooi Simpson (born September 2, 1931) served Wyoming in the U.S. Senate from 1979 to 1997. Despite his connection to the Republican Party, he is a liberal on social issues. He originally benefited from the conservative reputation of his father, Milward Simpson, who served Wyoming in the U.S. Senate from 1962 to 1967, after having been governor of Wyoming from 1955 to 1959. Simpson has been an advocate of fiscally conservative positions and argued strongly for entitlement reform. However, on social issues, he supports abortion and same-sex marriage. Simpson is most known for the Simpson-Mazzoli Act, which granted amnesty to three million illegal aliens. He was a co-chairman of the Simpson/Bowles committee. Since leaving the Senate, Simpson has taught at his alma mater, the University of Wyoming at Laramie.

Simpson's political leanings can be summed up in his own words:

Any education that matters is "liberal." All the saving truths, all the healing graces that distinguish a good education from a bad one or a full education from a half empty one are contained in that word.

In the 2002 gubernatorial election, Simpson accused two primary candidates, Ray Hunkins of Wheatland and Bill Sniffin of Lander, of having lied about the record of Eli Bebout, Simpson's choice for the party nomination. Simpson claimed that Hunkins and Sniffin had misrepresented Bebout's position on nuclear waste dumping and water rights: "These gents running for governor - I mean Ray Hunkins and Bill Sniffin - wouldn't seem to know the truth if it bit 'em on the fanny."[1] Simpson subsequently apologized to Hunkins.[1] Bebout won the nomination but was defeated in a close vote by the Democrat Dave Freudenthal in the general election.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Simpson apologizes to Hunkins. Billings Gazette (August 27, 2002). Retrieved on April 19, 2016.