Atheists in foxholes monument

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Dan Barker, co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation

The atheist organization the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) declares on their website:

The Freedom From Religion Foundation erected its monument to “Atheists in Foxholes” in 1999 at Lake Hypatia, Alabama. FFRF dedicated its second monument at the Rose Zerwick Memorial Garden and Courtyard adjoining Freethought Hall's new entrance.

The monument is dedicated to the many members of the military who were “atheists in foxholes,” as well as to all freethinkers (atheists, agnostics, and skeptics of any persuasion) who serve in the U.S. military.[1]

The FFRF website also indicates concerning the monument:

This is FFRF's second Atheists in Foxholes monument. The prototype, which was carved by World War II veteran Bill Teague, is nestled in piney woods next to FFRF's southern Freethought Hall near Munford, Ala., which is overseen by its chapter, the Alabama Freethought Society.

FFRF worked with Pechmann Memorials, which also carved the patio pavers — bearing donor names and slogans — surrounding the monument in the cozy courtyard space.[2]

The Miltary Association of Atheists and Freethinkers wrote concerning the "Atheists in Foxholes" monument:

The Freedom From Religion Foundation has posted a great new monument to atheists in foxholes. The 2-ton granite monument sits at the site of their new headquarters building. FFRF has a long-standing commitment to honoring military personnel with their original monument having being posted in Alabama decades ago.[3]

The atheist Hemant Mehta wrote about the monument:

Now outside the Freedom From Religion Foundation’s headquarters is this 4,743-pound granite monument...

The monument, made of the same South Dakota granite that Mount Rushmore is carved from, is more than 7 feet high, reflects the long windows that are part of the original 1855 building and provides a focus for the new Rose Zerwick Memorial Garden and Courtyard adjoining Freethought Hall’s new entrance. A teak bench opposite the display provides a spot for reflection.[4]

Atheist in foxholes monument, FFAF and the saying "There are no atheists in foxholes"

See also: There Are No Atheists In Foxholes and Views on atheists and Mocking of atheism

Sam Blum, wrote at Inverse.com, concerning the "Atheists in foxholes monument": "The old aphorism 'there are no atheists in foxholes,' has served to spark the ire of the Freedom From Religion Foundation time and time again...".[5] Often when people know something gets under a particular groups skin (particularly an unpopular group such as American atheists), they will use it repeatedly to taunt them. See also: Mocking of atheism

The endurance of the saying "There are no atheists in foxholes"

See: Endurance of the saying "There are no atheists in foxholes"

See also

Notes