List of people who supported eugenics

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People who ever supported eugenics and other forms of forced sterilization as a part of population politics, sorted by date of birth. Before the excesses of World War II, many intellectuals, some of whom were thought of as very nice people and cared so very, very much about IQ and their ivory towers and stuff like that, supported eugenics. Eleanor Roosevelt and her notions of UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and such tended to cause such ideas fall out of vogue for the following several decades.

List

  • Francis Galton (February 16, 1822)
  • Moses Harman (October 12, 1830)
  • Allan W. Thurman (1847)
  • Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847)
  • Lucien Howe (September 18, 1848)
  • David Starr Jordan (January 19, 1851)
  • John Harvey Kellogg (February 26, 1852)
  • Henry Fairfield Osborn (August 8, 1857)
  • Sigard Adolphus Knopf (November 27, 1857)
  • Leonard Darwin (January 15, 1850)
  • John Harvey Kellogg (February 26, 1852)
  • Luther Emmett Holt (March 4, 1855)
  • E. S. Gosney (November 6, 1855)
  • George Bernard Shaw (July 26, 1856)
  • Charles Fremont Dight (1856)
  • Clarence Darrow ( April 18, 1857)[1]
  • Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858)
  • Havelock Ellis (February 2, 1859)
  • Sidney Webb 1st Baron Passfield (July 13, 1859)
  • Alice Lee Moqué (October 20, 1861)
  • Stewart Paton (April 19, 1865)
  • Edward Alsworth Ross (December 12, 1866)
  • Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868)
  • Albert Johnson (March 5, 1869) - congressman
  • John Campbell Merriam (October 20, 1869)
  • Katherine Bement Davis (January 15, 1860)
  • Robert Latou Dickinson (1861)
  • Harry Chandler (May 17, 1864)
  • Madison Grant (November 19, 1865)
  • Charles Davenport (June 1, 1866)
  • Joseph DeJarnette (September 29, 1866)
  • Gertrude Crotty Davenport (June 1, 1866)
  • Henry H. Goddard (August 14, 1866)
  • Irving Fisher (February 27, 1867)
  • William E. Castle (October 25, 1867)
  • Robert DeCourcy Ward (November 29, 1867)
  • Samuel Jackson Holmes (March 7, 1868)
  • Prescott F. Hall (September 27, 1868)
  • H. G. Wells (September 21, 1866)[2]
  • W. E. B. Du Bois (February 23, 1868)[3]
  • Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868)[4]
  • Harry J. Haiselden (March 16, 1870)
  • Roswell Hill Johnson (1877)
  • Henry Farnham Perkins (1877)
  • William Lawrence Tower (1872)
  • Edward Thorndike (August 31, 1874)
  • Robert Yerkes (May 26, 1876)
  • Elmer Ernest Southard (July 28, 1876)
  • Lewis Terman (January 15, 1877)
  • Aaron Rosanoff (June 26, 1878)
  • Charles Goethe (March 28, 1875)
  • Irénée du Pont (December 21, 1876)
  • Alexis Carrel (June 28, 1873)
  • Herbert Hoover (August 10, 1874)
  • Winston Churchill (November 30, 1874)[5]
  • Margaret Sanger (September 14, 1879)[6][7]
  • Helen Keller (June 27, 1880)
  • Marie Stopes (October 15, 1880)[8][9]
  • Harry H. Laughlin (March 11, 1880)
  • Ivey Foreman Lewis (August 31, 1882)
  • Paul Popenoe (October 16, 1888)
  • William Gordon Lennox (1884)
  • Frederick Osborn (March 21, 1889)
  • Anna Blount (c. 1880) - physician
  • Henry S. Huntington (1882)
  • Lothrop Stoddard (June 29, 1883)
  • Stephen Sargent Visher (1887)
  • John Maynard Keynes (June 5, 1883)
  • Charles Galton Darwin (December 18, 1887)
  • Wickliffe Draper (August 9, 1891)
  • Norman Haire (January 21, 1892)
  • Carlos Blacker (December 8, 1895)
  • Alan Frank Guttmacher (May 19, 1898) - vice-president of the American Eugenics Society
  • Hermann Joseph Muller (December 21, 1890)
  • Madge Macklin (February 6, 1893)
  • Elmer Pendell (1894)
  • William Herbert Sheldon (November 19, 1898)
  • Benjamin D. Wood (November 10, 1894)
  • Morris Steggerda (September 1, 1900)
  • Linus Pauling (February 28, 1901)[10]
  • Charles Lindbergh (February 4, 1902)[11]
  • Harry L. Shapiro (March 19, 1902)
  • Joseph Fletcher (April 10, 1905)
  • Robert Klark Graham (June 9, 1906)
  • William Shockley (February 13, 1910)
  • Nathaniel Weyl (July 20, 1910)
  • Seymour Itzkoff (1928)
  • William Luther Pierce (September 11, 1933)
  • John Glad (December 31, 1941)
  • James L. Hart (1944)

Living people

Notes

  1. In the November 18, 1915 edition of the Washington Post, Darrow stated: “Chloroform unfit children. Show them the same mercy that is shown beasts that are no longer fit to live.” However, Darrow was also critical of some eugenics advocates.
  2. Jacky Turner, Animal Breeding, Welfare and Society Routledge, 2010. ISBN 1844075893, (p.296).
  3. Awakenings: On Margaret Sanger. Retrieved on 2 May 2015.
  4. "Judgment At Pasadena", Washington Post, 16 March 2000, p. C1. Retrieved on 30 March 2007.
  5. Winston Churchill and Eugenics. The Churchill Centre and Museum (31 May 2009). Retrieved on 28 November 2011.
  6. Margaret Sanger (the founder of Planned Parenthood), quoted in Katz, Esther (2002). The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-02737-6. “Our ... campaign for Birth Control is not merely of eugenic value, but is practically identical in ideal with the final aims of Eugenics” 
  7. Franks, Angela (2005). Margaret Sanger's eugenic legacy. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-2011-7. “... her commitment to eugenics was constant ... until her death” 
  8. Soloway, R. A. (1996). “Marie Stopes and The English Birth Control Movement”. London: The Galton Institute. Robert A. Peel, editor.
  9. Rose, J. (1993). Marie Stopes and the Sexual Revolution. London: Faber and Faber Limited.
  10. Mendelsohn, Everett (March–April 2000). The Eugenic Temptation. Harvard Magazine.
  11. https://www.minnpost.com/community-voices/2009/07/good-riddance-mr-lindbergh

External links