Angier Goodwin

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Angier L. Goodwin
Angier Goodwin.jpg
Former U.S. Representative from Massachusetts's 8th Congressional District
From: January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1955
Predecessor Arthur D. Heasley
Successor Torbent H. Macdonald
Former State Senator from Massachusetts's 4th District
From: 1929–1941
Predecessor Alvin E. Bliss
Successor Sumner G. Whittier
Former Mayor of Melrose, Massachusetts
From: 1921–1923
Predecessor ???
Successor Paul H. Provandle
Former State Representative from Massachusetts's 22nd District
From: 1925–1928
Predecessor ???
Successor Mary L. Barrows
Information
Party Republican
Spouse(s) Eleanor H. Stone
Religion Unitarian[1]

Angier Louis Goodwin (January 30, 1881 – June 20, 1975) was a Republican from Massachusetts who represented the state's 8th congressional district from 1943 to 1955 in the United States House of Representatives. He was previously a mayor and legislator in both houses of the Massachusetts legislature.

Background

Goodwin was born in late January 1881 to the former Ruby Hoxie and Albert B. Goodwin in Fairfield, Maine, located in Somerset County. After graduating from Colby College, he attended Harvard in 1905 and was admitted to the bar in Massachusetts the following year.

U.S. House of Representatives

Goodwin was elected to the House in the 1942 midterms, defeating Democrat Frederick T. McDermott by twelve percentage points.[2] He was re-elected five times[3] though lost in the 1954 midterms to Torbert H. Macdonald.[4]

Cox Committee

Goodwin was a member of the 1952 Cox Committee, the Select Committee to Investigate Tax-Exempt Foundations and Comparable Organizations during the 82nd Congress.[5] It is named after its chair, Eugene E. Cox, a Democrat segregationist from Georgia.

The committee sent questionnaires to foundations and conducted hearings, although the scope of the investigations was relatively shallow.[6] Cox died in December 1952, having only read and approved what became the first half of the final report. The subsequent report whitewashed subversive activities among tax-exempt foundations.

A member of the select committee, conservative Republican congressman B. Carroll Reece of Eastern Tennessee, expressed discontent with the limited time and scope of the investigation, stating:[7]

As pointed out and stressed in this report, the select committee has had insufficient time for the magnitude of its task. Although I was unable to attend the full hearing I feel compelled to observe that, if a more comprehensive study is desired, the inquiry might be continued by the Eighty-third Congress with profit in view of the importance of the subject, the fact that tax-exempt funds in very large amounts are spent without public accountability or official supervision of any sort, and that, admittedly, considerable question able expenditures have been made.

—Carroll Reece

Reece Committee

On July 27, 1953, the House of Representatives voted to re-enact the Select Committee to Investigate Tax-Exempt Foundations and Comparable Organizations at the request of Rep. Reece.[6] Goodwin was part of the forty-nine GOP representatives who voted against the resolution.[8] The other remaining members of the Cox Committee still in the House (Brooks Hays, Aime Forand, and Richard Simpson) likewise voted against the resolution.

Notwithstanding his vote, Goodwin was placed onto the select committee (known as the Reece Committee) along with Michigan conservative Republican Jesse Wolcott, who supported the resolution.[8] He ultimately signed the final Dodd report and proved to be vital in approving it, though expressed disagreement over the conclusions, submitting a differing assertion in which he expressed a concurrence for the report of the previous Cox Committee.[6]

References

  1. Goodridge to Gordinier. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  2. MA District 08 Race - Nov 03, 1942. Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  3. Candidate - Angier L. Goodwin. Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  4. Hanley, Robert (May 22, 1976). Rep. Macdonald, 58, Dies; Led Election Law Reform. The New York Times. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  5. HEARINGS BEFORE THE SELECT COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE TAX-EXEMPT FOUNDATIONS AND COMPARABLE ORGANIZATIONS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES EIGHTY-SECOND CONGRESS SECOND SESSION ON H. Res. 561. American Deception. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 FascinatingPolitics (December 22, 2019). The Reece Committee on Foundations: Conspiratorial Nonsense or an Expose of a Threat to the Nation?. Mad Politics: The Bizarre, Fascinating, and Unknown of American Political History. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  7. January 1, 1953. Final Report Of The Select Committee To Investigate Foundations And Other Organizations (Pursuant to H. Res. 561, 82d Cong.), p. 1. Retrieved October 6, 2021. Final Report, pp. 14. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  8. 8.0 8.1 H RES 217. RESOLUTION CREATING A SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CON- DUCT A FULL AND COMPLETE INVESTIGATION AND STUDY OF EDUCA- TIONAL AND PHILANTHROPIC FOUNDATIONS AND OTHER COMPARABLE ORGANIZATIONS WHICH ARE EXEMPT FROM FED. INCOME TAXATION.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved August 8, 2021.

External links

  • Profile at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • Profile at Find a Grave