Anxiety

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Believing in God can help block anxiety and minimize stress.[1][2]

See: Atheism and anxiety and Atheism and the brain

Anxiety afflicts almost everyone in some way. It affects how people feel and behave; anxiety has very real physical symptoms. Mild anxiety is vague and unsettling, while severe anxiety can be extremely debilitating. As with any addiction, anxiety can be overwhelming and harmful to one's physical health.

A liberal denial of infinity and eternal life can be the root of anxiety. The Gospel of Mark has an early description of anxiety as part of a parable: "Other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it, and it yielded no grain."[3]

A lack of faith can also be a primary cause of anxiety (see: Atheism and anxiety and Atheism and emotional problems and Atheism and mental illness and Atheism and cowardice and Atheism and mental toughness).[4][5][6] In addition, a false perception of reality, an exaggerated dependence on things outside of one's control, and a lack of meaningful purpose can be contributing causes.

Extreme anxiety, also known as an anxiety disorder, is common among American adults (and probably higher percentages among teenagers):[7]

  • 31% of U.S. adults suffer from anxiety disorder at some point
  • roughly 19% have an anxiety disorder in a given year, and women tend to be more affected (23%) than men (14%)

Causes of Anxiety

A number of factors including stress appear to contribute to the development of anxiety.

Anxiety is often triggered by stress in one's life. Specific people may be more vulnerable to anxiety than others, but even those who become anxious easily can learn to manage it well. People can also make themselves anxious with negative self-talk - a habit of always telling themselves the worst will happen. [1]

How to Recognize Anxiety

Some of the following physical symptoms could be present:

Anxiety feels a bit like fear, but whereas one knows what they are frightened of, one often doesn't know what they are anxious about.

Symptoms of anxiety could be confused with physical illness; for example: becoming worried that you might be suffering a heart attack or stroke could increases anxiety. We all become anxious from time to time. It becomes a problem when it interferes with life in the absence of real threat, or goes on too long after the danger has past. Avoiding situations that make one anxious might help one feel better in the short term. The trouble is when the anxiety keeps returning, and has a habit of spreading to other situations. This could lead to one avoiding things like shops, crowded places, lectures or tutorials. So although avoidance makes one feel better, that relief is only temporary and sometimes one may worry about what will happen next time. Every time one avoids something, it could be harder next time they tries to face it. Gradually one could want to avoid more and more things. Ibidem

Relaxation techniques and regular exercise could help in the treatment of anxiety.

Prevention

“The 3 key components for success are as follows: psychological preparedness, physical conditioning, mental toughness.”- the Christian and martial artist Chuck Norris[8]

Ways to reduce one's risk of anxiety disorders include:[9][10][11]

- Religion/spirituality.[12][13][14] See: Atheism and anxiety and Atheism and emotional problems and Atheism and mental illness and Atheism and cowardice and Atheism and mental toughness

- Reduction of caffeine intake

- Having a balanced, nutritious diet

- Keeping a regular and sufficient sleep pattern

- Regularly exercising

- Avoiding alcohol, cannabis, and other recreational drugs

- Checking with a health professional before using over-the-counter or herbal remedies

See also

External links

Notes

  1. Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief, Journal of Religion and Health, December 2017, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 1998–2009
  2. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009
  3. Mark 4:7 (ESV). The Gospel of Matthew then repeated this at Matthew 13:7 , and the Gospel of Luke repeates this at Luke 8:7 . Notice how all three Gospels recite this same verse about anxiety at the prime number of verse 7.
  4. Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief, Journal of Religion and Health, December 2017, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 1998–2009
  5. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Medical Xpress website
  6. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009
  7. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/any-anxiety-disorder#:~:text=Prevalence%20of%20Any%20Anxiety%20Disorder%20Among%20Adults,-Based%20on%20diagnostic&text=An%20estimated%2031.1%25%20of%20U.S.,some%20time%20in%20their%20lives.
  8. Chuck Norris quote, Quote Fancy website
  9. Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief, Journal of Religion and Health, December 2017, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 1998–2009
  10. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009
  11. Anxiety: Symptoms, types, causes, prevention, and treatment, Medical News Today
  12. Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief, Journal of Religion and Health, December 2017, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 1998–2009
  13. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Medical Xpress website
  14. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009