Atheism and mental toughness

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The prestigious Mayo Clinic found that that religious involvement and spirituality are associated with better physical health, mental health, health-related quality of life and other health outcomes.[1]

The Telegraph reported: "Patients with a strong “intrinsic faith” (a deep personal belief, not just a social inclination to go to a place of worship) recover 70 per cent faster from depression than those who are not deeply religious." (see also: Atheism and depression).[2] The prestigious Mayo Clinic found that that religious involvement and spirituality are associated with better physical health, mental health, health-related quality of life and other health outcomes.[1]

The Apostle Paul and the other disciples of Jesus Christ went through severe persecution and hardship without mentally breaking down (2 Corinthians 11:25-28). According to Dr. Ernest Liang at Houston Baptist University, resilience is a hallmark of Christian character.[3]

On the other hand, the election of Donald Trump upset many secular leftists to the degree that it caused them depression and mental illness (see: Secular leftists and psychogenic illness and Atheism and depression and Atheism and suicide).

On October 2, 2019, the atheist David Silverman indicated the experience of being accused of sexual harrassment, being fired from the American Atheists organization and losing many of his former atheist friends caused him a "horrific level of pain" that "damaged" him and that he now has textbook symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.[4] In addition, he did have suicidal thoughts.[5] Furthermore, he says he now takes medication and he is still a damaged person.[6] Silverman formerly served as the president of the American Atheists organization. Silverman told atheist David Smalley in an interview that he suffers from depression and that he doubts his self-worth.[7]

When asked if he believes in God, Jordan Peterson responded: "I think the proper response to that is No, but I'm afraid He might exist".[8] In 2019, the New York Post published an article Jordan Peterson enters rehab after wife’s cancer diagnosis which indicated "The “12 Rules for Life” author has sought help trying to get off the anti-anxiety drug clonazepam".[9]

Atheism and anxiety

See also: Atheism and anxiety

Brain study: Religious belief vs. non-belief - Anxiety/stress reduction

Believing in God can help block anxiety and minimize stress, according to new University of Toronto research that shows distinct brain differences between believers and non-believers.[10] See: Atheism and anxiety and Atheism and the brain

See also: Religious belief vs. non-belief - Anxiety/stress reduction and Atheism and the brain

According to the leading science news website Phys.org:

Believing in God can help block anxiety and minimize stress, according to new University of Toronto research that shows distinct brain differences between believers and non-believers.

In two studies led by Assistant Psychology Professor Michael Inzlicht, participants performed a Stroop task - a well-known test of cognitive control - while hooked up to electrodes that measured their brain activity.[11]

Atheism and anxiety

Atheism, cowardice and debates

Beginning in the latter part of the 20th century, there were a number of notable instances of prominent atheists being reluctant to debate (see: Atheism and cowardice).

In the 21st century, the cowardice associated with atheism has become so obvious that it is making newspaper headlines.[12] On May 14, 2011, the British newspaper The Daily Telegraph published a news story entitled Richard Dawkins accused of cowardice for refusing to debate existence of God.[13] In The Daily Telegraph article Dr. Daniel Came, a member of the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford University was quoted as writing to fellow atheist Richard Dawkins concerning his refusal to debate Dr. William Lane Craig, "The absence of a debate with the foremost apologist for Christian theism is a glaring omission on your CV and is of course apt to be interpreted as cowardice on your part."[13]

Western atheists, Western culture, masculinity, toughness and atheists' lack of stoicism

See also: Atheist whining

According to the American Psychological Association, "Western culture defines specific characteristics to fit the patriarchal ideal masculine construct. The socialization of masculine ideals starts at a young age and defines ideal masculinity as related to toughness, stoicism, heterosexism..."[14] Atheists have a reputation for whining (see: Atheist whining).[15][16][17]

After the Elevatorgate controversy, the new atheist Richard Dawkins chose to complain about being bullied by feminists rather than being stoic about the situation and the Washington Post reported on November 18, 2014:

“I don’t take back anything that I’ve said,” Dawkins said from a shady spot in the leafy backyard of one of his Bay Area supporters. “I would not say it again, however, because I am now accustomed to being misunderstood and so I will . “

He trailed off momentarily, gazing at his hands resting on a patio table.

“I feel muzzled, and a lot of other people do as well,” he continued. “There is a climate of bullying, a climate of intransigent thought police which is highly influential in the sense that it suppresses people like me.”

Recent criticism of Dawkins has come from women, many of them within the atheist movement, which has long drawn more men to its ranks. His online remarks, some women say, contribute to a climate they see as unwelcoming to female atheists.

Writing for Salon last month, atheist activist Amanda Marcotte said: “People like Dawkins . are the public face of atheism. And that public face is one that is defensively and irrationally sexist..."

Some atheist men, too, are unhappy with Dawkins’ most recent remarks[18]

An excerpt from Richarddawkins.net that was is also quoted from a column at Independent.ie:

So Mary Kenny thinks that there are more atheist men than women, and that this is the result of some sort of attempt at overt manliness on their part. She really must try to pay attention - to Richard Dawkins, for example whom one could hardly describe as being the epitome of machismo."[19][20]

Richard Dawkins and his stress related stroke

See also: Richard Dawkins' health

As a result of the controversy relating to a Dawkins Twitter post about feminism/Islam, Dawkins was disinvited to speak at the 2016 Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism (NCSS) (See: Feminists cause Richard Dawkins to be disinvited to skeptic conference).[21] Stephanie Zvan is an atheist blogger at Freethought Blogs. She wrote an open letter to the Center for Inquiry (CFI) about the events surrounding the Dawkins' Twitter post about feminism/Islam that "CFI now has a harassment denialist on its board, a harassment denialist who has tied his denialism to his work at your organization."[22]

Dawkins said he was very upset about being disinvited to the conference.[21] After his disinvitation, Dawkins gave some news about his health condition after suffering a minor stroke and he mentioned that his doctors advised avoiding controversies due to his chronic high blood pressure.[23] In recent times Dawkins has been embroiled in a number of controversies involving the topics of feminism/Islam and he has faced a significant amount of criticism from his fellow skeptics/liberals (see: Richard Dawkins and women and Richard Dawkins and Islamophobia accusations).

Atheist Hemant Mehta reported about Dawkins' stroke and Dawkins' report that he had been once again invited to the conference:

It was the result of stress-related higher blood pressure, which he says he may have had as a result of recent controversy, including being booted from the NECSS conference. He added, however, that on February 5, he received a letter from conference organizers apologizing for disinviting him and asking him back to the conference.[24]

In December 2016, Dawkins appears to have started to Tweet again despite his doctors warnings to avoid controversy (For example, he tweeted that Britain had become a "nasty little backwater" after the Brexit vote and his Tweet drew fierce criticism).[25][26][27]

See also

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Mueller, Dr. Paul S. et al. (December 2001). "Religious involvement, spirituality, and medicine: implications for clinical practice". Mayo Clinic Proceedings vol. 76:12, pp. 1225-1235. Retrieved from Mayo Clinic Proceedings website on July 20, 2014.
  2. What God does to your brain by Julia Llewellyn Smith. The Telegraph, 20 Jun 2014
  3. Resilience: A Hallmark of Christian Character by Dr. Ernest Liang
  4. Our Disharmony w/ David Silverman & the "Atheist Movement"
  5. Our Disharmony w/ David Silverman & the "Atheist Movement"
  6. Our Disharmony w/ David Silverman & the "Atheist Movement"
  7. David Smalley On Social Justice In Atheism, go to the 1 hour 1 minutes and 18 second mark of the video]
  8. Blatchford, Christie (January 19, 2018). "Christie Blatchford sits down with 'warrior for common sense' Jordan Peterson". National Post. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  9. Jordan Peterson enters rehab after wife’s cancer diagnosis, New York Post, 2019
  10. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009
  11. Researchers find brain differences between believers and non-believers, Phys.org, March 4, 2009
  12. Multiple references:
  13. 13.0 13.1 Richard Dawkins accused of cowardice for refusing to debate existence of God, The Daily Telegraph, May 14, 2011
  14. Harmful masculinity and violence, American Pyschological Association
  15. Atheists: No God, no reason, just whining by Charlotte Allen, Los Angeles Times
  16. God save us from atheist whining, Spiked
  17. Ah, the Spirit of the Season… Whining Atheists With Double Standards!, National Review
  18. Richard Dawkins stands by remarks on sexism, pedophilia, Down syndrome, by Kimberly Winston | Religion News Service November 18, 2014 and syndicated to the Washington Post
  19. Atheist men and women, Op-ed, ALAN BOURKE, CHARLESLAND COURT, GREYSTONES, CO WICKLOW, Independent.ie website
  20. Taken from a forum post at Richard Dawkins' ex-forum
  21. 21.0 21.1 An update on Richard Dawkins condition in his own words
  22. Dawkins Goes Denialist: An Open Letter to the CFI Board by Stephanie Zvan at Freethought Blogs
  23. Richard Dawkins Gives Update on His Health in Audio Message
  24. Richard Dawkins: England becoming a 'nasty little backwater' after Brexit vote, The Telegraph, March 2017
  25. SHOCK RANT: Richard Dawkins mocks Christians for 'pretending' there's WAR on Christianity, Express, December of 2016
  26. What British Scientist Dawkins Thinks Of Islam, Swaraya, June 7, 2017