Essay: What do atheists eat?

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The dietary practices of atheists are largely dependent on where they live and where they were raised. A majority of the world's atheists are likely East Asians (see: Asian atheism and Global atheism).

What do atheists eat?

The dietary practices of atheists are largely dependent on where they live and where they were raised (see: Dietary practices of atheists).

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[1] See: Global atheism and Asian atheism and Western atheism and race

Asian atheists diet

Western atheists diet

A very significant portion of atheists eat pork - especially Chinese atheists.

See: Atheists and pork consumption

Do atheists eat pork?

See also: Health risks of eating pork

Do atheists eat pork? Many do. In fact, a very significant portion of atheists eat pork - especially Chinese atheists.

For further information, please see: Atheists and pork consumption

Do atheists eat horses?

Atheism and food science

See: Atheism and food science

Atheism and culinary science

Do atheists eat dogs?

Do atheists eat cats?

Both China and Vietnam practice state atheism.

Please see:

Atheism and veganism

See: Atheism and veganism

Atheistic cultures and baby/children eating

In 2014, The Washington Times reported: "China’s one child policy, baby trafficking, and sex trafficking of North Korean women aren’t the worst human rights violation happening in the country. Aborting innocent and healthy unborn children and eating them to boost one’s stamina and sexual health is.[2]

See: Atheists and baby eating

For additional information, please see:

Atheistic cultures and children eating

Atheism and cannibalism

See: Atheism and cannibalism

See also

External links

Notes

  1. A surprising map of where the world’s atheists live, By Max Fisher and Caitlin Dewey, Washington Post, May 23, 2013
  2. Chinese cannibalism of infant flesh outrages the world, Washington Times, 2014