Talk:Uranium One bribery scandal

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As this National Review column helpfully points out, Bill Clinton's Russia speech fee was five times the size of Russia's Facebook ad buy. To the listen to the MSM tell it, this trivial ad buy was the pivot on which the 2016 election swung. Guess what? Rosenstein was the US attorney with jurisdiction over the FBI office that led the investigation into Russian racketeering in the U.S. uranium industry. PeterKa (talk) 09:51, 22 October 2017 (EDT)

Tenam & CS-1

Techsnabexport supplied low-enriched uranium under the 1993 interstate agreement between Russia and the United States on the processing of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Soviet nuclear warheads into low-enriched uranium (LEU), fuel for American nuclear power plants. The HEU-LEU contract worth more than $ 13 billion was completed in 2013. But Techsnabexport, which had formed ties with US energy companies, maintained its presence in the United States - its American sales company Tenam was supposed to support and expand this business. And then her supervisor was arrested. Mykeria's acquaintances believe that he could be informed about by competitors or offended colleagues in business.

"In a highly competitive environment, it is difficult to hide unreasonable payments. Competitors and colleagues will certainly inform law enforcement agencies. Our people forget that in the United States they are in other conditions - there they will not reckon with their status and the importance of contracts, "- says former Prosecutor General Yuri Skuratov.

Fee for consulting

In the Maryland District Court indictment in the Mikerin case and three others whom the investigation calls his accomplices, it is said that the FBI paid attention to suspicious financial transactions after reporting a "confidential source" (in the indictment, he is called CS-1) .

Two friends Mikerin and a person close to Rosatom believe that this is an employee of the American consulting company Sigma Transnational. The representative of Sigma and her President William Campbell did not respond to the letter and phone calls of Vedomosti. The Sigma website says that her expertise in business and political consulting is based on 90 years of experience. The firm also manages projects in a variety of fields, including energy and biotechnology, works with the US Department of Defense and provides advisory services to businesses related to nuclear materials and import-export operations. The Sigma website mentions that she provided services to Techsnabexport and assisted him in approving and completing contracts for $ 1.2 billion with 13 US companies.

"Confidential source" told the FBI that he had a common acquaintance with Mikerin, on which he came back in 2003 thanks to a man from Florida, whose name is not disclosed. But the source believes that this man from Florida is associated with Russian and Eurasian "organized crime", the indictment says.

In 2009, according to the prosecution, Mikerin inclined CS-1 to paybacks for the right to sign a contract with Techsnabexport for lobbying and consulting services, as well as assistance in PR of the Russian nuclear industry. These payments Mikerin, according to the source, called the "system" or "window". The source was worried about this agreement and went to the FBI, where he was asked to continue to participate in the recoiling scheme, giving the bureau all the information. He told everything in detail.

According to his testimony, in general, the consulting company paid $ 460,000 as kickbacks. Moreover, the appetite of the recipients grew. For the implementation of the first contract in 2009, "Techsnabexport" was supposed to pay the consulting company $ 150,000 for three months, and Mikerin claimed a third of this sum. Payments under the second contract were $ 550,000 for 11 months, and Mikerin required to roll back about half.

In 2011, Mikerin allegedly extended the contract for 11 months in the interests of Techsnabexport. This time, kickbacks came in many different ways, including cash. Mikerinu money was transferred for two years in yellow envelopes for $ 25,000-50,000, the indictment says. One day, Mikerin asked CS-1 to put $ 5,000 in five yellow envelopes, explaining that it was for the officials of Techsnabexport who would come to the US, it follows from the document.

One day, meeting with Mikerin, a source that the FBI pre-equipped with a dictaphone, called Mikerin to frank talk about the recoil scheme, trying to revise the terms of the contract. Микерин recognized, that actions (demands of recoils) were illegal, and named extorted means "business operation". Mikerin told the source that the people who are responsible for facilitating this payment system are potentially dangerous and can harm the source if Micherin has to report a problem with payments. Mikerin demanded not to tell anyone about the scheme and warned that he himself would deny everything, the indictment says.

Fee for transportation

The man who introduced the source and Mikerin, died in August 2011, indicated in the indictment. As Vedomosti found out, that month the employee of the American consulting firm Sigma Transnational Rodney Fisk died. In the past, he was an official in the Foreign Office of South Africa, he gained experience in diplomatic work in the field of "peaceful nuclear cooperation", as well as control and regulation of export-import operations with nuclear materials, and promoted the Russian-American HEU-LEU contract, his official obituary. The fact that it was he who brought Mikerin and the FBI informant to the "Vedomosti" was confirmed by three people associated with the companies mentioned in the case.

Among Fisk's employers there was another company suspected of paying kickbacks at the request of Mikerin. From 1998 to 2009, Fisk was the president of the American company Transport Logistic International (TLI), which, a year after its inception, signed a contract with Techsnabexport and began to participate in the transportation of uranium under a HEU-LEU contract.

How did TLI get such a profitable contract almost at the start of its work? She could intercept him from a larger company thanks to the connections of her employees, share the opinion of people close to the contract participants. Coincidentally, the top managers of TLI, according to the investigation, paid the most kickbacks at the direction of Mikerin - $ 1.69 million.

The fact is that Fisk and his colleague Norman Revencroft worked for many years in the American giant Edlow International, which has been transporting radioactive and nuclear materials since 1957 and has more than a hundred clients in 50 countries. It was Edlow in the 1990s who was responsible for transporting uranium under the HEU-LEU contract. But in 1998 Revencroft left Edlow and founded the TLI. In the same year, Fisk joined him. And in 1999, TLI obtained a contract for transportation of uranium, and Edlow was not even mentioned in the future.

It is people from the TLI, according to the investigation, paid the most kickbacks at the direction of Mikerin. In October 2014, in addition to Mikerin, charges were brought against two top managers of TLI - American citizens, spouses Darren and Carol Condry. According to the investigation, from 1996 to 2013, with their help, TLI, at the request of Mikerin, paid $ 1.69 million as kickbacks, and without contracts received contracts from Techsnabexport for $ 33 million.

After Fisk retired from his post in TLI in 2010, Mikerin, as stated in Condri's indictment, asked them by e-mail whether payments would continue or, as he wrote, "whether the company [ TLI] on this account a new policy and whether the situation with the "pie" and complete mutual understanding will remain. " In his letters to Darren Condry, he used the phrase "pie size" earlier to denote the size of kickbacks, the investigation believes.

President Edlow Jack Edlow did not comment on the situation with the contract with Techsnabexport, saying only that he had never heard of the consulting company Sigma. Neither TLI nor Sigma responded to the letters of Vedomosti.

Charges for containers

About the supplier of "Techsnabexport" - American company Westerman - it is in the indictment of the Condri couple. She, in the opinion of the investigation, was very worried about her reputation and paid kickbacks through an intermediary in the guise of fees for consultations - only $ 108,000 for 2012.

The name of the company was not given, it was mentioned only that it was located in the town of Bremen, Ohio. But Bremen is a very small town, more like a village. There is only one company related to the nuclear industry, Westerman Inc., which produces tanks and tanks for the oil and gas industry and for the transportation of radioactive materials in particular.

In his letter to the vice-president of this American company, Mikerin, according to the investigation, called him Barry. Westerman Inc. was a vice president with that name - this is Barry Keller. In the indictment of Condri's spouses, he is called "accomplice No. 2".

To receive money, Mikerin, as stated in the indictment, used the services of an intermediary - businessman Boris Rubizhevsky, who had a consulting firm Nexgen. She accumulated money on her account, and then transferred them, as the investigation suspects, to Mikerin. Rubizhevsky is the fourth defendant after Mikerin and Condri's spouses.

In 2012 Westerman was acquired by another American company - Worthington Industries, where they did not answer Vedomosti's questions. Contact with Rubizhevsky failed.

If the charges are proven, the suspect and the suspect are facing up to 20 years in prison.

"Techsnabexport" through the law firm Orrich Russia sent to the US law enforcement agencies requests for information on the merits of claims made to Micheline and expressed readiness for constructive interaction.

Where did the money go

When it was not about cash, Mikerin, negotiating kickbacks, instructed other suspects to transfer money to three firms, according to investigators. From April 2009 to April 2011, the postings went to Wiser Trading, registered in Seychelles. From July 2011 to July 2013 - to the British Leila Global Limited to the account in the Latvian bank. And from August 2013 to May 2014 - to Ollins Development on the British Virgin Islands.

Confirmation of this FBI staff found after the death of Fisk. They asked his widow to provide access to the safe kept by Fisk, and in October 2011 they found there among other things information about bank postings to the firms Leila and Wiser, as well as a paper version of e-mail correspondence of Mikerin.

These firms are little known, but each of them has a curious history.

So, Wiser Trading was mentioned in connection with another suspicious transaction. Podmoskovny football club "Saturn", being in a difficult financial situation, in 2009, transferred to her $ 400,000, as it was said in the contract, for services to sign a contract with football player Evgeny Levchenko. Levchenko himself learned of such a transaction only from a publication in Novaya Gazeta, which promulgated the agreement, and was very surprised: no one informed him of such payments, and he had never heard of Wiser before. Negotiations on the transition to "Saturn" in 2009 led him Andrei Pryadkin - the brother of the current president of the Russian Football Premier League (RFPL) Sergei Pryadkin, assuring that the contract will be transparent. Sergei Pryadkin did not answer the questions of Vedomosti, the RFPL representative said that the league can not comment on a story that has nothing to do with it. I could not contact Andrei Prjadkin.

The former general director of "Saturn" Igor Efremov, at which the money went to the company Wiser, did not answer the questions of Vedomosti.

British Leila Global has a website that says that it sells steel products - pipes, rods and bars, and also buys scrap metal. The phone number on the site does not work. The firm did not reply to Vedomosti's letter.

As director of Leila Global, a Latvian citizen, Denny Banger, was mentioned, who appeared as a nominal director in a hundred organizations. Latvian journalists, participants in the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP), managed to find Banger. He played in a basketball team for one of the Latvian banks and assured reporters that someone had used his information without his knowledge. He, along with several other nominee directors, was listed as the head of the firms related, in particular, to the "Magnitsky case", as well as to the firm that tried to place Russian coal in Ukraine in October 2014 at an inflated price.

About Ollins Development in the indictment says that it is located in Switzerland, but the Swiss registry does not contain data on this structure. In fact, it is registered in the British Virgin Islands. Nevertheless, the "Swiss firm" Ollins Development also met in the reports of some Russian enterprises. So, she acted as a metallurgical trader, buying the products of OJSC "Vtorsvetmet", and in the past - OJSC "Polema", which is part of the metallurgical group "Coke". Ollins sent the purchased products for export. The representative of the group said that "Coke" is not related to Ollins Development. Familiar with the contracts Ollins man told Vedomosti that Ollins, in particular, was engaged in titanium scrap and had to do with the dismantlement of nuclear submarines. In 2014, according to the Panjiva international database on maritime transport, Ollins Development was the shipper of the American structure VSMPO-Avisma, VSMPO Tirus. Contact with Ollins Development failed.

The representative of VSMPO could not comment on the situation, pointing out that he was not aware of such a supplier.

Perhaps, these are service firms that receive money in the interests of third parties and transfer them further for a certain commission, thinks the partner of Paragon Advice Group Alexander Zakharov. They can serve the interests of completely different people, not connected in any way, he notes.

In the preparation of the article, Vitaly Petlevoi

http://compromatwiki.org/Ядерные_схемы_Вадима_Микерина

Kickbacks for Russian uranium in America. The case of Vadim Mikerin

14 November, 2014, Alexander Grant


The head of the company TENAM Vadim Mikerin. Photo from the site vedomosti.ru

In late October, the federal prosecutor's office of Maryland announced the arrest of 55-year-old Russian citizen Vadim Mikerin , who is accused of criminal conspiracy to extort "kickback" for contracts to transport uranium from dismantled warheads from Russia to the United States.

Father Mikerin in the 1980-1990's worked in senior positions in the Ministry of Medium Machine Building of the USSR, and then in the Russian Minatom. In 1992, the United States and Russia signed the so-called HEU-LEU treaty (also called "Megatons into Megawatts"), in which highly enriched uranium extracted from Russian warheads was processed into low-enriched uranium and sent to American nuclear power plants.

Mikerin Jr. is the head of the Russian-American company TENAM-USA, established in 2010 by the Russian foreign trade company Techsnabexport for the direct export of spent uranium to the US market. As reported by the Russian newspaper Vedomosti, at the end of last year, TENAM export portfolio of TENAM exports 19 contracts, directly and indirectly, with 12 American energy companies totaling approximately 5.8 billion dollars. " I think that the "anti-Putin" sanctions introduced after this led to the termination of these contracts.

Vadim Mikerin's associates call the federal prosecutor's office 49-year-old American spouses Darren and Carol Condry of Glenwood in Maryland, as well as the 63-year-old immigrant from the former USSR, Boris Rubizhevsky of Kloster, New Jersey, but they face separate charges. Condri's spouses are led by Transport Logistic International (TLI), which since 1996 has received contracts from Techsnabexport for transportation of uranium from Russia to the United States. President of NEXGEN Security Rubizhevsky advised Mikerin and TENAM. According to the prosecutor's office, from 1996 to 2013, TLI paid Micheline at least $ 1.69 million in kickbacks to get $ 33 million worth of contracts from Techsnabexport without a tender. In November 2011, to obtain such kickbacks, Micheline needed an intermediary,

Many documents of the Mikerin case are still classified, but there is access to the affidavit application filed with the federal court on July 25, 2014 by David Gadren, an investigator at the Inspector General's Department of the Ministry of Energy. About himself, Gadren said that he has served in the department since October 2008, and is currently "appointed FBI Task Force Officer in Washington."

Immediately, I note that in the affidavit several times mention some accomplice Mikerin, whose surname or initials are smeared with black ink, and I will call it "X". Agent Gadren explained to the judge that in 2009, "X" brought Vadim Mikerin with the secret informant of the FBI CS-1 (Confidential Source), and Vadim Evgenievich persuaded him to work for the firm TENEX. In turn, CS-1 informant got acquainted with "X" in 2003 in Florida through a common acquaintance, according to CS-1, "indirectly connected with Russian and Eurasian organized criminal elements". According to the concluded agreement, CS-1 undertook to engage in "lobbying and consulting" for TENEX, as well as "help and PR of the Russian nuclear industry", receiving money for this, and giving some of them to Mikerin in the form of kickbacks. In conversations and reports, Vadim Mikerin called this "system" and "window"

The first contract was concluded in 2009, and according to him, the CS-1 was to receive for three months 250 thousand dollars, of which Micherine demanded a third. The money should be transferred to the bank account of Wiser Trading Limited, registered in Seychelles. According to the second contract, CS-1 was due for 11 months 550 thousand dollars, of which he was to "roll back" to Mikerin about half, but transferred in parts of 50 thousand dollars to the account of Alpha Bank and Eurobank in Cyprus.

In 2011, Mikerin on behalf of TENEX extended the contract with CS-1 for another 12 months and required the transfer of his stake in various ways, including cash payments, as well as transfers to off-shore accounts. At the direction of Vadim Mikerin, CS-1 paid him cash three times - on January 25 and October 28, 2011 to 25 thousand dollars and on January 23, 2012 - 50 thousand dollars. In all cases, he sent money in yellow envelopes, and in one case it was 5 envelopes of 5 thousand dollars each, and Vadim Mikerin explained that these envelopes will need to be distributed to TENEX employees who arrive in the US. In another case, when CS-1 met with Mikerin to discuss the new terms of their agreement, he was equipped with a secret recorder and, following instructions from FBI agents, led Vadim Evgenievich to say that they violated the law.

At the same meeting, Micherine under the record said that people who installed the kickback system are very dangerous, and if Mikerin complains about them on CS-1, he will not find it enough. Mikerin ordered CS-1 to keep his mouth shut and assured him that in case of what he himself would deny everything. When fulfilling CS-1 of the third contract in 2011, Mikerin told him that communication with Wiser Trading was lost, and offered to transfer the kickbacks of the UK-registered company Leila Global Ltd., but to her account in the Riga ABLV bank in Latvia. It was established that Leila Global was headed by a Russian, and with the help of British and Latvian colleagues, agent David Gadren learned that Leila Global was subject to a Cypriot dummy company run by two Latvian citizens.

According to Citibank, where Vadim Mikern has a personal account, he put a total of $ 3,500 through an ATM in the city of Washington, and it happened in October 2011 when he received a cash back from CS-1. There were several such cases, and when on February 1, 2014 in the office of TENAM conducted a search sanctioned by the judge, it turned out that Vadim Mikerin was actively engaged in what his colleagues knew nothing about. In his office they found files about transactions between American companies and "dummies", including the already known Leila and Wiser, as well as the Swiss-registered Ollins Development Ltd.

In August 2011, the mysterious "X" died, and the FBI agents met with his widow, asking permission to inspect and photograph the contents of the personal safe of the deceased. The widow allowed, and in October of the same year agents examined the items lying in the safe, which the widow "X" later gave to Vadim Mikerin. There was a Citibank check-book in the name of Mikerin and his debit card; information about the bank accounts of the companies Leila and Wiser, two yellow envelopes with the inscriptions "$ 5.00" and "$ 10.000", as well as the initials of the Mikerin. There was also a copy of the e-mail of Mikerin, sent to them on December 15, 2010, and the living "X" to the address schlyapa2009@yandex.ru.

In a letter to the "Russian hat," Mikerin reported that a certain IFS received a large commission for two contracts worth $ 244,000, asking for information as soon as possible, "what steps to take under the IFS agreement with our friends." And so on, and so forth, as a result of which on October 29 Vadim Mikerin was arrested in the Washington suburbs where he lives. And two days later, the federal prosecutor's office of the Maryland County confirmed that this "55-year-old Russian citizen living in Chevy-Chase, Maryland, is accused of conspiracy to extort money when obtaining from the state-owned Russian company contracts without other contenders for these contracts" . The prosecution threatens Mikerin with imprisonment for up to 20 years, charges in court are assistants to the federal prosecutor Adam Eyck and James Crowell, and defense attorney Daniel Harson. Vadim Mikerin does not appear on the list of prisoners of federal prisons and is not guilty until the court's decision.

Immediately after the arrest of Mikerin, the Russian agency TASS reported that before "the US authorities tried to exert pressure on him and persuade him to secretly cooperate against Russia." The agency referred to the two applications of the federal prosecutor's office available in the case to postpone orders for the arrest of Mikerin and for searches in his case, as well as temporarily to classify the accusation and the accusative supporting accusations.

"This request," the prosecutors, Adam Eyck and Rod Rosenstein wrote to Judge Magistrate William Conelli, "is due to the fact that these orders were issued during the ongoing investigation of several suspects in racketeering and corruption that concern important infrastructure, as a result of national security" . Then it was said that "Mikerin is currently in Russia, while others can be rich Russians without significant ties with the United States," that is, they may abscond from the investigation, and there is no extradition treaty between Russia and the United States.

In another document, the request to recall the warrant for the arrest of Vadim Mikerin is explained by the fact that this is "a foreigner from the state with compulsory consular notifications", that is,a the arrest of Mikerin should immediately be notified to the Russian consulate. However, according to this document, "agents hope for his consent to secretly cooperate against high-ranking state officials of his country. Currently, the accused is abroad, but is registered for a flight arriving in the US in the next weekend. Agents plan on his return to show him the collected evidence and offer cooperation ", which is impossible in case of arrest. If Vadim Mekerin cooperates, authors of the petition noted, "the agents would like to have the opportunity not to arrest him."

This document is dated August 27, 2014, but in the affidavit of Gadren's agent there is another more than curious message. "On November 16, 2013 (that is, a year ago - AG), the customs officer stopped Mikerin when he and his wife flew to London and Copenhagen, and found a yellow envelope from 5 thousand dollars." It is clear that they were customs officers of the American airport, and it is understandable that they acted on the "tie-up" of the FBI agents, who already knew about the kickbacks in yellow envelopes from the submission of CS-1. It is unclear why Vadim Evgenievich did not prick up his ears and returned to America.

Source: Russian Advertising

http://www.runyweb.com/print/articles/12/kickbacks-for-russian-uranium-in-america.html

Rosatom

In 1991 the Russian Federation inherited the nuclear programs of the former Soviet Union. The Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation (Rosatom) is the successor agency to the Soviet state nuclear agencies. Rosatom is aggressively pursuing export contracts throughout the world with its business model of “Build-Own-Operate” (BOO). Rosatom offers to attend to all aspects of construction and operation of a nuclear project. Theoretically, this model would allow a nation to become a nuclear state even though it has little to no knowledge and infrastructure in place to support operation and oversight of a nuclear reactor. The model increases the client's dependency on Rosatom to operate the reactor, as well as its dependency on imported uranium.

Russia's main exports throughout the Cold War were AK-47s and T-62 tanks. When Hitler invaded in mid 1941 Russia was unprepared and spent the entirety of World War II bringing its weapons manufacturing capacity up to strength. When the War ended, Soviet arms production didn't stop. Only a portion of Soviet manufacturing was converted to peacetime domestic consumer goods. The end of the Cold War brought a pledge from the new Russian leaders to end the export of Marxist revolution and AK-47s, in exchange for membership in the IMF and G8, and access to World Bank loans.

Uranium is the one viable clean energy source that does not create carbon emissions. By 2014 Russia controlled 60% of the world's uranium supply and half of all enrichment capacity.[1] Energy was one export commodity Russia had to integrate itself into the global trading system. Along with its crude oil and natural gas reserves Russia has set the goal for itself to become the world's energy power house. The American firm Westinghouse along with French and Japanese companies are Rosatom's major competitors. Rosatom has pursued various contracts to provide reactors in China, India, Iran, Turkey, Belarus, Armenia, Finland, Hungary, the UK, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Cape Verde, Namibia, Tunisia, Morocco, Brazil and Uruguay. Rosatom additionally has contracts in Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, France, Spain, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Slovenia, Libya, Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Venezuela, Argentina, South Africa, Tanzania, Japan, South Korea, Mongolia, Australia, Canada, Mexico and the US.

Disposal of nuclear waste is the most problematic issue facing the nuclear industry beyond the problem of proliferation. Rosatom has opted to reprocess highly radioactive spent fuel from its foreign plants. The radioactive waste must be cooled onsite for years before it can be transported. The transport of waste itself puts communities along the route at risk, and the final reprocessing generates an even greater volume of radioactive wastes. Reprocessing has been rejected in some nations, such as the United States. Reprocessing increases the volume of radioactive wastes and is a direct pathway to the production of separated weapons grade plutonium.

Blending, on the otherhand, is the recycling of nuclear weapons material into nuclear fuel for power plants. In 1992, the United States and Russia signed the HEU-LEU treaty (also called "Megatons into Megawatts"), in which highly enriched uranium extracted from disassembled Russian warheads was blended into low-enriched uranium and sent to American nuclear power plants. In coming years the program fueled ten percent of U.S. electricity. Tenex (Techsnabexport) is the Rosatom subsidiary responsible for the sale and transportation of this uranium to the United States. Tenex maintained its presence in the United States under the name Tenam, established about October 2010, based in Bethesda MD. The HEU-LEU contract worth more than $13 billion terminated in 2013.

Mikerin and Tenex

Vadim Mikerin was a Director of the Pan American Department of Tenex from about 2004 through about 2010, and was the President of Tenam from about October 2010 through about October 2014. Tenam serviced 19 contracts, directly and indirectly, with 12 American energy companies. As Tenam's director Mikerin had tremendous leverage over American companies in an extortion scheme that awarded contracts to transport uranium in exchange for kick-backs.[2]

Between 2004 and October 2014, Mikerin conspired with others to transmit funds from Maryland and elsewhere in the United States to offshore shell company bank accounts located in Cyprus, Latvia, Switzerland and the Seychelles Island for the purpose of promoting a corrupt payment scheme that violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).

The payments were made to influence Mikerin and to secure improper business advantages for U.S. companies that did business with Tenex. Mikerin used consulting agreements and code words such as “lucky figure,” “LF,” “cake” and “remuneration” to disguise the corrupt payments. Mikerin pleaded guilty in 2014 “to helping orchestrate more than $2 million in bribe payments through a web of secret accounts in Cyprus, Latvia, and Switzerland.” His actions, according to the US government, occurred “with the consent of higher level officials at Tenex and Rosatom…”.

Vadim Mikerin was sentenced for extortion and money laundering on Decenmber 15, 2015.

Mueller investigation

According to court filings in the United States District Court for the District of Maryland, in 2009, the FBI began an investigation into corruption and extortion by senior managers of Tenex, a subsidiary of Rosatom, a Russian entity.[3] Robert Mueller was FBI Director at the time the investigation into the Rosatom subsidiary began.[4]

The investigation began as an intelligence probe into Russian nuclear officials.

During the investigation, federal agents attempted to convince Mikerin to turn on his Russian colleagues by showing him evidence of relationships between “shell companies and other Russian energy officials, including President Vladimir Putin.” He refused to expose them and was subsequently arrested and charged.[5]

The Maryland District Court indictment of Mikerin and three others said that the FBI paid attention to suspicious financial transactions after a tip from a "confidential source" (in the indictment, he is called CS-1). Two friends of Mikerin and a person close to Rosatom believe that this is an employee of the American consulting company Sigma Transnational. The representative of Sigma and its President William Campbell have not commented.

Sigma's website says its expertise in business and political consulting is based on 90 years of experience. The firm manages projects in a variety of fields, including energy and biotechnology, works with the US Department of Defense and provides advisory services to businesses related to nuclear materials and import-export operations. The Sigma website mentions that it provided services to Tenex and assisted Tenex in approving and completing contracts for $1.2 billion with 13 US companies.

The "confidential source" told the FBI that he had a longtime acquaintance with Mikerin which was revived in 2003 thanks to a man from Florida, whose name is not disclosed. But the source believes that this man from Florida is associated with Russian and Eurasian "organized crime", the indictment says.

In 2009, according to the prosecution, Mikerin inclined CS-1 to paybacks for the right to sign a contract with Tenex for lobbying and consulting services, as well as assistance in public relations for the Russian nuclear industry. These payments Mikerin, according to the source, called the "system" or "window". The source was worried about this agreement and went to the FBI, where he was asked to continue to participate in the kickback scheme, giving the bureau all the information. He told everything in detail.

According to CS-1's testimony the consulting company paid $460,000 as kickbacks. Moreover, the appetite of the recipients grew. For implementation of the first contract in 2009, Tenex was supposed to pay the consulting company $150,000 for three months, and Mikerin wanted a third of this sum as a kickback. Payments under the second contract were $550,000 for 11 months, and Mikerin required about half as a kickback.

In 2011, Mikerin allegedly extended the contract for 11 months in the interests of Tenex.

References

  1. https://www.caseyresearch.com/putins-colder-war/ It already controls a third of yellowcake-to-uranium-hexafluoride conversion.
  2. "In a highly competitive environment, it is difficult to hide unreasonable payments. Competitors and colleagues will certainly inform law enforcement agencies. Our people forget that in the United States they are in other conditions - there they will not reckon with their status and the importance of contracts, "- says former Russian Prosecutor General Yuri Skuratov.
  3. Government’s Response to Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss for Pre-Indictment Delay, United States v. Vadim Mikerin, Criminal No. TDC-14-0529 (D. MD) at 1. http://fcpa.stanford.edu/enforcement-action.html?id=583
  4. http://www.newsweek.com/how-robert-mueller-connected-probe-hillary-clintons-uranium-one-deal-688548
  5. Joel Schectman, U.S. sentences Russian nuclear official to four years for bribe scheme, Reuters (Dec. 15, 2015). The “Megatons to Megawatts” program converted uranium from thousands of Russian nuclear warheads for civilian use in U.S.nuvlesr power plants.