Lviv

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Monument to Nazi-collaborator Stepan Bandera unveiled in 2007 in Lviv.

L'viv (Polish: Lvov; German: Lemberg) is a city in the west of Ukraine and has a population of 728,350 (2016).

With the re-creation of the Polish state as a result of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, Lviv was taken from the defunct Austro-Hungarian Empire and given to Poland. In September 1939, as a result of Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, Lviv became a part of the Soviet Socialist Republic of Ukraine.

Historic Centre

The city of L'viv, founded in the late Middle Ages, was a flourishing administrative, religious and commercial centre for several centuries. Lviv City is situated on the crossing of two profitable ancient trade routes. It developed and flourished rapidly and became one of the main trade centers of medieval Europe. The medieval urban topography has been preserved virtually intact (in particular, there is evidence of the different ethnic communities who lived there), along with many fine Baroque and later buildings.[1]

It is a beautiful city full of the architecture of many influences including Austrian, Ukrainian and Polish since at various times in history all three laid claim to Lviv.

See also

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