6 Cassiopeiae

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6 Cassiopeiae
Observational Data
Designation 6 Cas
Right ascension 23h 48m 50.1705s[1][2]
Declination +62° 12′ 52.2577″[1][2]
Constellation Cassiopeia
Type of object Hypergiant star
Magnitude Apparent Mag: +5.43[3]
Absolute Mag: -8.06 / -5.95[3]
Astrometry
Distance from Earth 6154.03 ly[3]
Radial velocity -42.30 ± 0.6 km/s[1][4]
Proper motion RA: -3.57 mas/yr[1][2]
Dec: -1.57 mas/yr[1][2]
Parallax 0.53 ± 0.37 mas[1][2]

6 Cassiopeiae (6 Cas, HD 223385, HIP 117447, V566 Cas) is a hypergiant star in the constellation of Cassiopeia.[5] "6 Cassiopeiae" is the Flamsteed designation for the star, where stars are numbered by their right ascension relative to other stars present in the constellation they're in. The star is faint, shining at the fifth magnitude, but is just about bright enough to be visible with the unaided eye where it has a white color.

6 Cassiopeiae lies around 6154.03 light years from Earth.[3] The star is quite large with an estimated mass of 25 solar masses and radius 170 time larger than the Sun's.[6] The star's surface is believed to have a temperature of 10,023 K, which combined with the stars great radius mean it emits more than 200,000 times the energy that Sol does. The star's intrinsic brightness results in an absolute magnitude of around -6, but the sheer distance to the star along with an intervening dust cloud dims this to +5.43.[5] The star rotates slowly with an equatorial speed of 50 km/s which means it takes 170 days for 6 Cassiopeiae to complete one revolution. It also produces a variable but strong stellar wind that can ejects matter from the star at speeds up to 180 km/s.

The star is known to be a type of pulsating variable star known as an "Alpha Cygni" type.[7][8]The star varies in brightness only by 0.09 magnitudes with a period of 0.077 days or a little under two hours.[3][9] The star is not known to possess any exoplanets.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 6 Cassiopeiae. Simbad Astronomical Database. simbad.u-strasbg.fr. Retrieved on December 29, 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy & Astrophysics 474 (2): 653-664. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Bibcode2007A&A...474..653V.  arXiv:0708.1752
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 6 Cassiopeiae. universeguide.com. Retrieved on December 29, 2021.
  4. Gontcharov, G. A. (2006). "Pulkovo Compilation of Radial Velocities for 35 495 Hipparcos stars in a common system". Astronomy Letters 32 (11): 759-771. doi:10.1134/S1063773706110065. Bibcode2006AstL...32..759G.  arXiv:1606.08053
  5. 5.0 5.1 Jim Kaler (September 13, 2003). 6 Cas. stars.astro.illinois.edu. Retrieved on December 29, 2021.
  6. Cassiopeia Constellation. nineplanets.org (July 14, 2020). Retrieved on December 29, 2021.
  7. Samus, N. N.; Kazarovets, E. V.; Durlevich, O. V. et al. (2017). "General Catalogue of Variable Stars: Version GCVS 5.1". Astronomy Reports 61 (1): 80-88. doi:10.1134/S1063772917010085. Bibcode2017ARep...61...80S. 
  8. ESA (1997). "The HIPPARCOS and TYCHO catalogues. Astrometric and photometric star catalogues derived from the ESA HIPPARCOS Space Astrometry Mission". ESA Special Publication 1200. Bibcode1997ESASP1200.....E. 
  9. V566 Cas. sai.msu.su. Retrieved on December 29, 2021.