Essay: Secular leftism, future shock and the acceleration of 21st desecularization

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Mr. Secular Progressive, if you have great difficulty adjusting to the growth of religion in the world and its effects on societies due to your future shock, I suggest you quit the race in terms of trying to effect social change and leave in up to those who can adjust to the acceleration of 21st century desecularization.

Future Shock is a 1970 book written by American futurist Alvin Toffler and his spouse Adelaide Farrell. The book defines the term "future shock" as a certain psychological state of individuals and entire societies. A concise definition for the term "future shock" in the book is a personal perception of "too much change in too short a period of time".

Due to a string of socially conservative rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court in terms of cases related to abortion, school choice and religious schools (Carson v. Makin) and other social matters, and secular leftists being poorly able to mentally handle these societal changes, the secular left in the United States is getting further and further unhinged.

The website Marketwatch reported concerning the aftermath of the 2016 presidential race: Donald Trump’s win is causing a surge in demand for mental health services.[1] See also: Secular leftists and psychogenic illness and Donald Trump and American atheists

Of course, religious people can handle societal change better than secular leftists because they are mentally tougher (see: Atheism and mental toughness).

"As a racer you always have that in the back of your mind that. You always wonder "When is it going to happen?" Because it will happen. You will fall off." - Wayne Rainey, professional motorcycle racer.

American secular leftists are going bonkers about the reversal of Roe vs. Wade - despite the fact that it was castle built on air in terms of its legal foundations as far as U.S. law.

On May 6, 2022, the Washington Post reported about the former SCOTUS judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the Roe vs. Wade U.S. Supreme Court ruling: "Ginsburg, who died in 2020, criticized the 7-to-2 decision both before and after she joined the high court. She argued that it would have been better to take a more incremental approach to legalizing abortion, rather than the nationwide ruling in Roe that invalidated dozens of state antiabortion laws. She suggested a ruling protecting abortion rights would have been more durable if it had been based on the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution — in other words, if it had focused on gender equality rather than the right to privacy that the justices highlighted."

Questions: Where does the U.S. Constitution mention gender equality? If it doesn't mention gender equality, then why wasn't Ruther Bader Ginsberg advocating for a constitutional amendment so she could legally rule on such a matter? Ginsberg was a judge. She was not a legislator. There was the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, but it never passed. Phyllis Schlafly was very effective as far as her opposition of the Equal Rights Amendment. Also, do you think that Ruth Bader Ginsberg was right that the so-called right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution was a less than optimal legal foundation for Roe vs. Wade?

Secular leftism, future shock and the acceleration of 21st desecularization

Future Shock is a 1970 book written by American futurist Alvin Toffler and his spouse Adelaide Farrell. The book defines the term "future shock" as a certain psychological state of individuals and entire societies. A concise definition for the term "future shock" in the book is a personal perception of "too much change in too short a period of time". Due to a string of socially conservative rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court in terms of cases related to abortion, school choice and religious schools (Carson v. Makin) and other social matters, the secular left being poorly able to mentally handle these societal changes, the secular left is getting further and further unhinged.

The prestigious Mayo Clinic found that that religious involvement and spirituality are associated with better physical health, mental health, health-related quality of life and other health outcomes.[2]

The website Marketwatch reported concerning the aftermath of the 2016 presidential race: Donald Trump’s win is causing a surge in demand for mental health services.[3] See also: Secular leftists and psychogenic illness and Donald Trump and American atheists

Of course, religious people can handle change better than secular leftists because they are mentally tougher (see: Atheism and mental toughness).

Question: What do angry abortion activist protesting, whiny, secular leftist activists disguised as journalists and other angry liberals/leftists have in common? It's future shock as a new conservative age is beginning to unfold. See: Steve Turley on a new conservative age is rising

The exponential growth of religion and the collapse of irreligion can occur in irreligious societies (see: Growth of Christianity in China and Collapse of atheism in the former Soviet Union).

To see the magnitude of the explosive growth of Christianity in China, examine this graph about the growth of Christianity in China in a DW news story about Chinese Christianity (DW is a mainstream news outlet in Germany). There are now more Christians in China than Chinese who belong to the Communist Party of China (see also: East Asia and global desecularization).[4]

Professor Eric Kaufmann, who teaches at Birkbeck College, University of London, specializes in the academic area of how demographic changes affect religion/irreligion and politics. Kaufmann is an agnostic.

On December 23, 2012, Kaufmann wrote:

I argue that 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious.

On the other hand, the secular West and East Asia has very low fertility and a rapidly aging population... In the coming decades, the developed world's demand for workers to pay its pensions and work in its service sector will soar alongside the booming supply of young people in the third world. Ergo, we can expect significant immigration to the secular West which will import religious revival on the back of ethnic change. In addition, those with religious beliefs tend to have higher birth rates than the secular population, with fundamentalists having far larger families. The epicentre of these trends will be in immigration gateway cities like New York (a third white), Amsterdam (half Dutch), Los Angeles (28% white), and London, 45% white British.[5] [6]

See also: Acceleration of 21st century desecularization

Watoto Children's Choir from Kampala, Uganda.

In recent years, Christianity has seen a rapid growth in Africa.[7] See: Global Christianity

A study conducted by the Washington-based Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life says that Africans are among the most religious people on Earth.[8] Africa has a high fertility rate and it is seeing a big population boom. According to the Institute For Security Studies: "Africa's population is the fastest growing in the world. It is expected to increase by roughly 50% over the next 18 years, growing from 1.2 billion people today to over 1.8 billion in 2035. In fact, Africa will account for nearly half of global population growth over the next two decades."[9] See: Religion and Africa

At a conference Kaufmann said of religious demographic projections concerning the 21st century:

Part of the reason I think demography is very important, at least if we are going to speak about the future, is that it is the most predictable of the social sciences.

...if you look at a population and its age structure now. You can tell a lot about the future. ...So by looking at the relative age structure of different populations you can already say a lot about the future...

...Religious fundamentalism is going to be on the increase in the future and not just out there in the developing world..., but in the developed world as well.[10]

See also: Religion and migration and Growth of religious fundamentalism

Kaufmann wrote in his academic paper Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century

Today, values play a more important role in fertility behaviour, throwing the contrast between religious pronatalism and secular low-fertility individualism into relief. Over several generations, this process can lead to significant social and political changes. Early Christianity’s exponential rise during its gestation period from 30 to 300 A.D. has been traced to its superior demography (fertility, mortality and female sex ratio), which maintained a rate of growth similar to contemporary Mormonism: 40 percent per decade. For Christians, this led to a jump from 40 converts to 6 million inside three centuries. (Stark 1996) Christianity became the religion of an empire and a continent. In the United States, conservative sects increased their share of white Protestantism from roughly a third to two-thirds during the twentieth century – largely on the back of higher fertility. On the other hand, sects like the Shakers and Cathars, which permitted entry only through conversion, rapidly faded from the scene. Demographic religious revival is a medium and long-term phenomenon, but awareness of shifting population composition can lead to political soul-searching and instability well before the full impact of demographic change takes place. This is clear in ethnically-tense societies like Israel, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Lebanon, Cote D’Ivoire or Assam.[11]

Dr. Steve Turley wrote:

According to University of London scholar Eric Kaufmann’s detailed study on global demographic trends, we are in the early stages of nothing less than a demographic revolution. In Kaufmann’s words, "religious fundamentalists are on course to take over the world." There is a significant demographic deficit between secularists and conservative religionists. For example, in the U.S., while self-identified non-religionist women averaged only 1.5 children per couple in 2002, conservative evangelical women averaged 2.5 children, representing a 28 percent fertility edge. Kaufmann notes that this demographic deficit has dramatic effects over time. In a population evenly divided, these numbers indicate that conservative evangelicals would increase from 50 to 62.5 percent of the population in a single generation. In two generations, their number would increase to 73.5 percent, and over the course of 200 years, they would represent 99.4 percent. The Amish and Mormons provide contemporary illustrations of the compound effect of endogamous growth. The Amish double in population every twenty years, and projections have the Amish numbering over a million in the U.S. and Canada in just a few decades. Since 1830, Mormon growth has averaged 40 percent per decade, which means that by 2080, there may be as many as 267 million Mormons in the world, making them by 2100 anywhere from one to six percent of the world’s population.

In Europe, immigration is making the continent more religiously conservative, not less; in fact, London and Paris are some of the most religiously dense areas within their respective populations. In Britain, for example, Ultra-Orthodox or Haredi Jews constitute only 17 percent of the Jewish population but account for 75 percent of Jewish births. And in Israel, Haredi schoolchildren have gone from comprising a few percent to nearly a third of all Jewish pupils in a matter of five decades, and are poised to represent the majority of the Jewish population by 2050. Since 1970, charismatic Christians in Europe have expanded steadily at a rate of 4 percent per year, in step with Muslim growth. Currently, Laestadian Lutherans in Finland and Holland’s Orthodox Calvinists have a fertility advantage over their wider secular populations of 4:1 and 2:1 respectively.

In contrast, Kaufmann’s data projects that secularists, who consistently exemplify a low fertility rate of around 1.5 (significantly below the replacement level of 2.1), will begin a steady decline after 2030 to a mere 14 to 15 percent of the American population. Similar projections apply to Europe as well. Kaufmann thus appears to have identified what he calls "the soft underbelly of secularism," namely, demography. This is because secular liberalism entails its own “demographic contradiction,” the affirmation of the sovereign individual devoid of the restraints of classical moral structures necessitates the freedom not to reproduce. The link between sex and procreation having been broken, modernist reproduction translates into mere personal preference. It thus turns out that the radical individualism so celebrated and revered by contemporary secular propagandists is in fact the agent by which their ideology implodes.[12]

Steve Turley on a new conservative age is rising

Steve Turley and others indicate we are living in a new conservative age.

An Amish farm near Morristown, New York.

Please see:

Steve Turley's videos on a new conservative age is rising:

Shockofgod and atheist future shock

See also: Atheism is a clown and it did not know it

Logo for the Shockofgod YouTube channel.

"The hostility I am getting over this question is unbelievable...It's like..picture this...Atheism is a clown and it didn't know it. And then I got the clown and I walked it over...I forced it to look itself in the mirror. And it sees itself in all its red hair, big nose, big shoes, polka dot glory."

"Here is the question and then we will get to these awesome emails of atheists leaving atheism because the atheists cannot provide proof and evidence that atheism is accurate and correct...The question is: What proof and evidence can you provide that PROVES that atheism is accurate and correct?...You see I left atheism because the lack of proof and evidence that it is accurate and correct. The proof and evidence is for Jesus Christ."

For more information, please see: Atheism is a clown and it did not know it

Classic quotes from the Shockofgod YouTube channel

See also: Attempts to dilute the definition of atheism

"The hostility I am getting over this question is unbelievable...

See also: Atheism is a clown and it did not know it
  • "I received another email about someone becoming a Christian and leaving atheism... Now as you guys know, the atheist community on YouTube and also on radio and TV...They are in panic mode. It is obvious. Everyone on YouTube can see that this question that we are asking atheists that they cannot answer is really panicking the atheist community....Here is the question and then we will get to these awesome emails of atheists leaving atheism because the atheists cannot provide proof and evidence that atheism is accurate and correct...The question is: What proof and evidence can you provide that PROVES that atheism is accurate and correct?...You see I left atheism because the lack of proof and evidence that it is accurate and correct. The proof and evidence is for Jesus Christ."
  • "We are getting atheists leaving atheism. They are like dropping like flies. They are realizing...You know what? Atheism is madness. There is no proof and evidence that atheism is accurate and correct."
  • "An email from an atheist: 'There is no proof and evidence that atheism is accurate and correct. Happy now?' Ha! Ha! Ha! And he goes on and on about Santa Claus. Oh atheists, feel the sting."
  • "The hostility I am getting over this question is unbelievable...It's like..picture this...Atheism is a clown and it didn't know it. And then I got the clown and I walked it over...I forced it to look itself in the mirror. And it sees itself in all its red hair, big nose, big shoes, polka dot glory."[13]
  • "The Atheists Experience Show has failed. Dprjones has failed. Well, you know they're atheists. They're used to failure...Every atheists has failed."
  • "What proof and evidence can you provide as an atheist that atheism is accurate and correct. Game over atheists. You have nothing. Do not pass go. Do not collect $200. Game over."

Notes