William J. Burns

From Conservapedia
(Redirected from Bill Burns)
Jump to: navigation, search

William J. Burns is a lifelong career diplomat. He served as Ambassador to Russia in the George W. Bush administration, deputy secretary of state in the Obama Administration, and later CIA director in the Biden regime during the NATO war in Ukraine.

In a February 2024 commentary by former CIA analyst Larry Johnson entitled The Delusions of CIA Director William Burns, Johnson reviewed "Burns’ January 30, 2024 article in Foreign AffairsSpycraft and Statecraft: Transforming the CIA for an Age of Competition – is a shocking display of ignorance and misinformation about Russia, the state of the war in Ukraine and NATO's military capabilities...Although Burn’s is an educated man and experienced diplomat, this article displays a profound arrogance seasoned with provably false claims...The so-called vision he presents for “transforming the CIA” is a childish fantasy and signals that the CIA is drifting towards being irrelevant as well as incompetent".[1]

NATO war in Ukraine

See also: NATO war in Ukraine

On November 14, 2022, Ukrainian sources leaked a story claiming that Biden regime CIA director William Burns and Russian FSB head Sergey Naryshkin allegedly were meeting privately in Ankara, Turkiye.[2] TASS reported that Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov confirmed the reports, saying “Such negotiations really took place. It was the initiative of the American side.”

Terrorist attack on Nordstream pipeline

German protest against Russian sanctions and in favor of opening the Nord Stream pipeline on the morning before the U.S. environmental terrorist attack on the pipeline.[3]
See also: Nord Stream pipeline#Morganthau Plan 2.0

Joe Biden and his foreign policy henchmen—National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan, Secretary of State Tony Blinken, and Victoria Nuland, the Undersecretary of State for Policy—had been vocal and consistent in their hostility to the Nordstream pipelines, which ran side by side for 750 miles under the Baltic Sea from two different ports in northeastern Russia near the Estonian border, passing close to the Danish island of Bornholm before ending in northern Germany.

The direct route, which bypassed any need to transit Ukraine, had been a boon for the German economy, which enjoyed an abundance of cheap Russian natural gas—enough to run its factories and heat its homes while enabling German distributors to sell excess gas, at a profit, throughout Western Europe. Action that could be traced to the Biden regime would violate US promises to minimize direct conflict with Russia. Secrecy was essential.

Many Germans saw Nord Stream 1 as part of the deliverance of former Chancellor Willy Brandt’s famed Ostpolitik, which would enable postwar Germany to rehabilitate itself and other European nations destroyed in World War II by, among other initiatives, utilizing cheap Russian gas to fuel a prosperous Western European market and trading economy.

Biden authorized Jake Sullivan to bring together an interagency group to come up with a plan. In December of 2021, two months before the first Russian tanks rolled into Ukraine, Sullivan convened a meeting of a newly formed task force—men and women from the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the CIA, and the State and Treasury Departments—and asked for recommendations about how to respond to Putin’s impending invasion.

Over the next several meetings, the participants debated options for an attack. The Navy proposed using a newly commissioned submarine to assault the pipeline directly. The Air Force discussed dropping bombs with delayed fuses that could be set off remotely. The CIA argued that whatever was done, it would have to be covert. Everyone involved understood the stakes. “This is not kiddie stuff,” according to a source directly familiar with the matter. If the attack were traceable to the United States, “It’s an act of war.”

The interagency group was initially skeptical of the CIA’s enthusiasm for a covert deep-sea attack. There were too many unanswered questions. Throughout “all of this scheming,” the source said, “some working guys in the CIA and the State Department were saying, ‘Don’t do this. It’s stupid and will be a political nightmare if it comes out.’” Nevertheless, in early 2022, the CIA working group reported back to Sullivan’s interagency group: “We have a way to blow up the pipelines.”

Illustration of a HAAWC anti-sub missile delivered by a Navy P8 subhunter.

On January 27, 2022 neocon provocateur Victoria Nuland stated at a U.S. State Department press briefing "one way or another Nord Stream II will not move forward."

What came next was stunning. On February 7, 2022 less than three weeks before the seemingly inevitable Russian invasion of Ukraine, Biden met in his White House office with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, who, after some wobbling, was now firmly on the American team. At the press briefing that followed, Biden defiantly said, “If Russia invades . . . there will be no longer a Nord Stream 2. We will bring an end to it.”[4]

Several of those involved in planning the pipeline mission were dismayed by what they viewed as indirect references to the attack. “It was like putting an atomic bomb on the ground in Tokyo and telling the Japanese that we are going to detonate it. The plan was for the options to be executed post invasion and not advertised publicly. Biden simply didn’t get it or ignored it.”

Biden’s and Nuland’s indiscretion, if that is what it was, might have frustrated some of the planners. But it also created an opportunity. According to the source, some of the senior officials of the CIA determined that blowing up the pipeline “no longer could be considered a covert option because the President just announced that we knew how to do it.”

The plan to blow up Nord Stream 1 and 2 was suddenly downgraded from a covert operation requiring that Congress be informed to one that was deemed as a highly classified intelligence operation with U.S. military support. Under the law, the source explained, “There was no longer a legal requirement to report the operation to Congress. All they had to do now is just do it—but it still had to be secret. The Russians have superlative surveillance of the Baltic Sea.”

The Agency working group members had no direct contact with the White House, and were eager to find out if Biden meant what he’d said—that is, if the mission was now a go. The source recalled, “Bill Burns comes back and says, ‘Do it.’”[5]

The Zelesnky Great Purge

In mid-January 2023 CIA director William Burns travelled to Kyiv for a secret meeting with Ukrainian dictator Vladimir Zelensky.[6] Prior to Burns arrival, the SBU and Department of the Interior had already put a bullet in the back of the head of Zelensky’s top negotiator with Russia, Denys Kiryeyev. Shortly after Dir. Burns left Kyiv, on the morning of January 18, 2023 a helicopter crashed in the town of Brovary in the eastern outskirts of Kiev region, killing the entire leadership of the Department of the Interior. According to the State Emergency Service of Ukraine, killed in the crash were Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine Denis Monastyrsky; First Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine Yevhen Enin; State Secretary of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine Yuriy Lubkovich; Deputy Head of the Patronage Service of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine Tatiana Shutyak; Head of the Department of Protection of the Department of Internal Security of the National Police of Ukraine, Colonel Mikhail Pavlushko; Lead Inspector of the Department of Communications Nikolay Anatsky; Senior Operative of the Department of Internal Security of the Police of Ukraine Andriy Marinchenko; helicopter commander Alexander Vasilenko; pilot Konstantin Kovalenko; and on-board mechanic Ivan Kasyanov.[7] The helicopter was a French built Eurocopter EC225 LP Super Puma or its equivalent. Witnesses said that the helicopter was spinning and burning in the air before crashing into a kindergarten.[8]

According to Hacker DPR Joker:

Kyrylo Budanov.[9]
"The Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine had long been aware that the leadership of the Ministry of Defense was trading Western arms, which came to Ukraine in the form of aid, for the benefit of third countries, and that this process was overseen directly by the head of the GUR, Budanov. By the way, this information has already surfaced somewhere.

The leadership of the Interior Ministry wanted their share and began collecting data through their structural units, which are associated with intelligence and surveillance. As a result, they managed to obtain evidence and began blackmailing. The military bosses promised a share to the police leadership, and the first tranche was paid. But it was pointless and unprofitable to pay any further.

In addition, the insolence of the minister of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, who had his head in the wrong place, was putting the military leadership under strain. And now the day had come when the kids from the GUR were able to demonstrate their skills. But that is not all. The sanction for this was given personally by Yermak, who is also in on the secret from the supreme narcissistic clown, Zelensky.[10]

On January 24, 2023 the Kyiv regime confirmed the removal of some dozen high ranking officials in cases ranging from bribery, to mismanagement of aid funds for purchasing food, to embezzlement, to spending aid money on expensive cars. Money that had been sent by the U.S. Congress to prepare defensive lines on the front against an onslaught of newly mobilized Russian forces disappeared in mass corruption schemes. Subcontractors sold food and supplies to the Armed Forces of Ukraine at inflated prices while politicians received kickbacks.[11] Another top presidential adviser and four deputy ministers – including two defense officials, along with five regional governors were forced out of their posts. Officials were not arrested, but rather allowed to flee the country with their looted millions after which their "resignation" was announced. And among the regional governors to step down included officials overseeing regions which have seen intense fighting, including the Zaporozhye and Kherson regions. Among those removed were:

  • Deputy Prosecutor General Oleskiy Symonenko
  • Deputy Minister for Development of Communities and Territories Ivan Lukeryu
  • Deputy Minister for Development of Communities and Territories Vyacheslav Negoda
  • Deputy Minister for Social Policy Vitaliy Muzychenk
  • The regional governors of Dnipropetrovsk, Zaporizhzhia, Kyiv, Sumy and Kherson.

And separately, “the defense ministry had earlier announced the resignation of deputy minister Vyacheslav Shapovalov, who was in charge of the army’s logistical support, on the heels of accusations it was signing food contracts at inflated prices.” He purchased military rations at inflated prices in what appears a scheme to line the pockets of contractors, and potentially involving kickbacks to himself. Politico reported:

"An exposé from the Ukrainian news website ZN.UA revealed last week that the defense ministry purchased overpriced food supplies for its troops. For instance, the ministry bought eggs at 17 hryvnias per piece, while the average price of an egg in Kyiv is around 7 hryvnias. According to ZN.UA, a contract for food procurement for soldiers in 2023 amounted to 13.16 billion hryvnias (€328 million).

This was two to three times higher than current rates for such food items.

Yahoo 8-16-22.jpg

The deputy head of the Zelensky administration Kyrylo Tymoshenko, who stands accused of living a lavish wartime lifestyle. Many mainstream media reports buried some of the key verified details. For example, BBC wrote simply that “Tymoshenko was implicated in several scandals during his tenure, including in October last year when he was accused of using a car donated to Ukraine for humanitarian purposes.”

But starting in early December local Ukrainian outlets, angered at the posh lifestyle of Ukrainian leaders at a moment tens of millions are without electrical power, began confirming that Tymoshenko drove high-end sports cars in and out of the capital, to and from mansions which typically range in cost from $10,000 to $25,000 per month.

The controversy extended to luxury vacations abroad as Ukrainians suffer the deprivations of war at home. “The departure of Symonenko, a deputy prosecutor general, comes after media reports that he spent a holiday in Spain this winter, reportedly using a car belonging to a Ukrainian businessman.”

Just prior to the wave of resignations, another official named Vasyl Lozynskiy was accused of receiving bribes to “facilitate” the purchase of generators at greatly hiked-up prices. Crucially, Lozynskiy as Deputy Minister of Infrastructure and Communities Development would have also been directly involved in overseeing how billions of dollars in Western humanitarian and infrastructure assistance gets doled out. Ukraine’s Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov is under scrutiny related to the growing probe and scandal.

On February 1, 2023 it was reported that Zelensky had turned on his old friend and benefactor Igor Kolomoisky. Kolomoisky's home was raided by the Ukrainian gestapo allegedly in connection with the embezzlement of oil products worth $1.09 billion and customs duty evasion "of astronomical amounts."[12]

Refereences