Mike DeWine

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Mike DeWine


70th Governor of Ohio
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 14, 2019
Lieutenant Jon Husted
Preceded by John Kasich

50th Attorney General of Ohio
In office
January 10, 2011 – January 14, 2019
Governor John Kasich
Preceded by Richard Cordray
Succeeded by Dave Yost

In office
January 3, 1995 – January 3, 2007
Preceded by Howard Metzenbaum
Succeeded by Sherrod Brown

59th Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
In office
January 14, 1991 – November 12, 1994
Governor George Voinovich
Preceded by Paul Leonard
Succeeded by Nancy Hollister

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's Ohio 7th district
In office
January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1991

Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Frances Struewing
Children 8

Michael DeWine is the Republican governor of Ohio, serving since January 2019. Previously, he served as the state's attorney general from 2011 to 2019, served two terms in the U.S. Senate, and several terms in the U.S. House of Representatives prior to that.

On February 17, 2012, DeWine switched his endorsement from Mitt Romney to the more conservative Rick Santorum.

In April 2019, DeWine signed a Heartbeat Bill into law, something his establishment predecessor, John Kasich, had vetoed.[1][2][3]

COVID-19

President Trump declared a National Emergency over Coronavirus and left the individual states to enact policy to protect their citizens. Out of an abundance of caution, Governor DeWine decides that Ohio will take the lead of the nation and shut the economy down. In this process, DeWine tramples over the Constitution while declaring that he will use science for his best judgements. DeWine's experiment to be first in the nation to close would eventually spread to an additional 40+ states. Other states that closed after Ohio started lifting restrictions and reopening while Ohio remains shutdown. DeWine delays details on authorized return to work for some Ohioans, staggers delayed reopening of others. No guidance at all for some businesses with the excuse "I got to get it right" and "We're not there yet." Meanwhile his crisis team of healthcare professionals held projections that were off by huge numbers. The science is out already, states that did not move into quarantine had no more increase in the infection rate than the states that did.

DeWine said Ohio will open for business May 15th yet he didn't lift the shelter-in-place order until May 19th. Supporters of DeWine like to point out Ohio is open when much is still shutdown; pools, amusement parks, camping grounds, live events. Many pubs and restaurants remain closed due to DeWine's overzealous mandates and intimidating use of government enforcement.

July 22nd DeWine changes his mind and by fiat orders all of Ohio to wear masks. This includes the least vulnerable group with 99.997% chance of contracting, preschoolers to 12th graders. He was asked for how long to wear masks, he said 4-6 weeks. Then back tracks and said he never said that despite it on record. His Lt. Gov. would come out shortly after and say masks are required to vote in November, with no end in site for their usage. College students can return full-time to school but have all their sports programs cancelled. High schoolers have part-time school and all sports are open to play with limited schedules. DeWine grants that each of Ohio's 88 counties can implement their own guidance on k-12 school re-openings. The vast majority opt for virtual classrooms 3 days and in-class school 2 days with all the social distancing and other restrictions.

The President held a rally in Ohio and DeWine was to be by his side. Instead DeWine had tested positive for Covid-19 and those plans were scrapped. The same day it was revealed he had another two Covid tests. The original was a false positive. People would speculate that he did this on purpose to avoid Trump. Everybody else tested in Ohio has to wait days for results. DeWine gets 3 tests and 3 results in the same day.

Taxes and Bailouts

One of Mike DeWine's first moves as a newly elected Governor was to raise taxes to pay for infrastructure repairs.

DeWine then signed HB6 into law. This bill is a billion dollar bailout of two Ohio nuclear plants run by First Energy. A petition is circulating to reverse the bailout signed into law. The FBI would get involved and charge DeWine's House Speaker Larry Householder with public corruption racketeering conspiracy on July 21st, 2020. DeWine himself has not acknowledged or responded to return the $25,000 in donations from First Energy. The HB6 bill is now scraped and the process will start anew.

Protests and Extremism

As Governor, he made it a public point to discuss George Floyd's death and gave his permission to assemble large scale gatherings in violation of all the COVID-19 rules and restrictions put into place. [4] DeWine would stress the need for peaceful protests, “Protests expressing outrage are not only understandable, but they are also appropriate..." [5] The exact opposite had occurred. An angry demonstration of 400 people caused damage to the capital Statehouse among other property over the course of three hours. [6]

Leftwing extremists and their political supporters call Christopher Columbus racist and demand that his statue must come down. Columbus is the state capital and Governor DeWine went into hiding and let the liberals remove American heritage. [7]

Ohio based Goodyear Tire company was exposed discriminating against Trump supporters and supporters of police in favor of Black Lives Matter and LGBT issues. President Trump called for a boycott for which DeWine disagreed with and proclaimed he is against boycotts of Ohio companies. DeWine is for discrimination as long as the company resides in Ohio.

DeWine moved to enact gun control legislation due to felons not punished for gun offenses. It remains to be seen if this will impact legal gun owners.

Impeachment

Conservative House members have had enough and moved forward impeachment articles against DeWine. [8] DeWine isn't worried because Ohio political leadership rubberstamps everything.

References