Richard Burr

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Richard Burr
Burr.jpg
Senior U.S. Senator from North Carolina
From: January 3, 2005 – present
Predecessor John Edwards
Successor Incumbent (no successor)
Information
Party Republican
Spouse(s) Brooke F. Burr
Religion Methodist

Richard Mauze Burr, born November 30, 1955 (age 64), Charlottesville, Virginia, is a liberal-leaning Republican United States Senator from North Carolina, who caved into the homosexual agenda on don't ask, don't tell and has voted at times with the pro-abortion side. Burr colluded with Democrat Sen. Mark Warner, vice-chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, to cover up the leak of the Carter Page FISA application, producing reams of fake news alleging that President Trump was an agent of Russia and leading to the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel.

When SSCI head of security James Wolfe threatened to subpoena Intelligence Committee senators in his defense, on Rod Rosenstein's instructions Wolfe was allowed to plead guilty to the lesser charge of lying to the FBI, rather than the more serious charges of leaking classified information. Wolfe leaked the information in an effort to remove President Trump from office on his superiors instructions.

In 1995, after running an unsuccessful bid for Congress in 1992, Burr was elected to the United States House of Representatives.[1] After his congressional term ended in 2005, he ran a successful campaign for the United States Senate. Burr has voted with a majority of his Republican colleagues ninety percent of the time during the current Congress.[2]

Burr supported the revocation of ex-CIA director John Brennan's security clearance after Brennan's roll in the Trump-Russia scam came to light.

Political career

In 2003, incumbent Democratic Senator John Edwards announced he will not run for a second term in order to run for President. The race for his Senate seat became competitive, with Republican Richard Burr defeating Democrat Erskine Bowles by five percentage points. In the Senate, Burr serves as ranking member of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee where he works to improve the quality of health care and service veterans receive. Burr also sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee; the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee; the Energy and Natural Resources Committee; and the Indian Affairs Committee.

Burr is a conservative who is pro-life, supports the death penalty, and favors smaller government and lower taxes.

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