Kate Brown

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Kate Brown
Governor of Oregon
From: February 18, 2015 – present
Predecessor John Kitzhaber
Successor Incumbent (no successor)
Former Secretary of State of Oregon
From: January 5, 2009 – February 18, 2015
Predecessor Bill Bradbury
Successor Jeanne Atkins
Former State Senator from Oregon's 21st District
From: January 13, 1997 – January 2, 2009
Predecessor Shirley Gold
Successor Diane Rosenbaum
Former State Representative from Oregon's 13th District
From: November 26, 1991 – January 12, 1997
Predecessor Judy Bauman
Successor Dan Gardner
Information
Party Democrat
Spouse(s) Dan Little

Katherine "Kate" Brown (born June 21, 1960 in Madrid, Spain, age 60) is the current Governor of Oregon. A bisexual Democrat, she became Secretary of State in 2009 and Governor on February 18, 2015, upon the resignation of controversial governor John Kitzhaber due to an ethics scandal. She is Oregon's second female governor after Barbara Roberts. A special gubernatorial election will be held in 2016.[1]

Brown is known as "Killer Kate" after the murder of a peaceful protester[2] at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge when she requested the Obama administration and the Comey FBI to harass peaceful protesters.[3]

Gestapo tactics

In a letter sent to President Barack Obama, Brown stressed her frustration and asked for help to bring a nearly three week long occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to a swift resolution.[4]

“I conveyed the harm that is being done to the citizens of Harney County by the occupation, and the necessity that this unlawful occupation end peacefully and without further delay from federal law enforcement,” she wrote of an earlier conversation with FBI Director Jimmy the Weasel Comey. “On behalf of all Oregonians, I appreciate your consideration of our desire to see this situation come to a close, and I thank you for your timely attention to this matter.”

In a press conference Brown publicly aired her frustrations with how President Obama handled the occupation. The occupation saw little action from federal authorities, with peaceful protesters free to come and go as they please.

“The residents of Harney County have been overlooked and underserved by federal officials’ response thus far,” Brown said at the press conference. “I have conveyed these very grave concerns directly to our leaders at the highest levels of our government.”

In a second letter Wednesday addressed to Comey and U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, Brown outlined those conversations and referred to the occupants led by Ammon and Ryan Bundy as “armed radicals.” Brown wrote,

“As you are both aware,” the governor wrote, “for more than two weeks now, these radicals have been allowed to stay unlawfully in the refuge approximately 30 miles to the south of Burns, Oregon, in Harney County. While it is easy to assume that an occupation in such a remote location does not threaten public safety and does not harm any victims, that perception is far from accurate. What adds to the tensions felt by the community is the reality that multiple ‘supporters’ of these individuals have joined, staying in local motels in the City of Burns, and the criminals on the refuge are allowed to travel on and off the premises with little fear of law enforcement contact or interaction.

Brown argued to Lynch and Comey that because the occupation is on federal land, it is the federal authorities’ responsibility to lead law enforcement’s response to the occupation.

“For the citizens of Harney County and indeed all Oregonians, I must insist on a swift resolution to this matter. Efforts to negotiate have not been successful, and now it is unclear what steps, if any, federal authorities might take to bring this untenable situation to an end and restore normalcy to this community.

Portland Antifa riots

Communists tore down a statue to Thomas Jefferson in Portland.
See also: Leftwing violence in the Trump era

In September 2020 Portland marked 100 consecutive nights of protests marred by vandalism, chaos, and even killing. Those bent on violence regularly started fires, threw projectiles at law enforcement officers, and destroyed property. Numerous law enforcement officers, among others, suffered injury. Shootings increased by more than 140% in June and July 2020 compared to the same period last year. In the midst of this violence, the Portland City Council cut $15 million from the police bureau, eliminating 84 positions. Crucially, the cuts included the Gun Violence Reduction Team, which investigates shootings, and several positions from the police team that responds to emergency incidents. In August 2020, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler sent a letter to President Trump expressly rejecting the Administration’s offer of federal law enforcement to stop the violent protests.[5] The Democrat Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum sued the Trump administration on behalf of the rioters.[6]

Antifa broke into the Portland, Oregon Justice Center,[7] housing the central police precinct and the sheriff's office, and set a room on fire with occupants still inside the building.[8] A man carrying an American flag was beaten by white Antifa terrorists.[9] Small businesses were vandalized and looted.[10][11] Stolen cars were driven into stores.[12] A Chase Bank branch was attacked[13] and set on fire.[14] Virtually all offenders in these incidents were white. Antifa terrorists attempted to blind police with laser lights. Communist protesters tore down a statue of Thomas Jefferson, author of "all men are created equal."[15] Antifa terrorists toppled the George Washington statue. Washington is commonly referred to as the "father of the nation."[16]

Portland has been the hotbed of subversive Anti-American communist and anti-Trump activity since 2017. More than 100 fires were set in and around downtown.[17] After the Minneapolis George Floyd riot, Portland was under siege by leftwing white supremacists nightly for over a month.[18] More than 100 people were injured and over $20 million in damages. Oregon Democrat governor Kate Brown did absolutely nothing to stop the violence.

References