Saikat Chakrabarti

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Saikat Chakrabarti is Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez chief of staff and managed her 2018 campaign. Chakrabarti and Ocasio-Cortez held majority control of Justice Democrats up to February 2019. The Justice Democrats appears to be an organization that is a money-laundering operation for illegal campaign donations.

Justice Democrats

Ocasio-Cortez and Chakrabarti obtained majority control of Justice Democrats PAC in December 2017. Justice Democrats PAC raised more than $1.8 million before her June 2018 primary. Ocasio-Cortez never reported to the Federal Election Commission that she and Chakrabarti, who served as her campaign chair, controlled the PAC while it paid money to her 2018 campaign committee.

Justice Democrats stated on its website from December 2017 until late February 2019 that Ocasio-Cortez and Chakrabarti held “legal control” of Justice Democrats PAC,[1]and the two still serve on the three-member board of Justice Democrats.

Ocasio-Cortez's campaign and Justice Democrats raised a combined $4.6 million during the 2018 midterm election cycle,

Armenian holocaust denier Cenk Uygur was forced from the board of Justice Democrats for what Chakrabarti called “extremely disturbing sexist and racist statements" in December 2017,[2][3] followed by Kyle Kulinski of the Young Turks who quit the same month. Justice Democrats then reported that Ocasio-Cortez and Chakrabarti were “governors” of the organization in a document submitted to the Washington, D.C. Department of Consumer & Regulatory Affairs on March 28, 2018. A third listed governor was the PAC's treasurer, Nasim Thompson.[4]

Brand New Congress

A Federal Election Commission complaint was filed alleging money laundering campaign donations to her boyfriend. Brand New Congress, a Soros front that helped her get elected. Early on, her website was a redirect page for the group Brand New Congress, archives in the Wayback Machine show.[5]

Brand New Congress paid Ocasio-Cortez's live-in boyfriend money in excess of campaign contribution limits.[6] Ocasio-Cortez had her boyfriend on her Congressional payroll staff after she took office. She later denied he was staff, but had granted unfettered access to her office IT system to unauthorized persons.[7]

FEC complaint

Additionally, Chakrabarti has been accused of funneling $1 million to two companies he controlled in a complaint filed by the National Legal and Policy Center with the Federal Election Commission. According to the Brand New Congress website, the PAC would build a "unified campaign" infrastructure including fundraising, organizing, rallies, and advertising progressive congressional candidates across the country could "plug into," saving the individual campaigns time and money.[8]

In 2016 and 2017, Chakrabarti's PACs raised about $3.3 million for the project, primarily from small donors. During this time, the committees transferred over $1 million to two shell companies controlled by Chakrabarti with names similar to one of the PACs, Brand New Campaign LLC and Brand New Congress LLC, according to federal election filings.

A few weeks after starting the Brand New Congress PAC, Chakrabarti formed one of the companies, Brand New Campaign LLC, in Delaware, using a registered agent service and mailbox-only address.

Over the next seven months, as small-dollar political donations poured into the PAC from progressives across the country, the committee transferred over $200,000, 82 percent of the contributions, to the company Brand New Campaign LLC. The payments were for "strategic consulting," according to federal election filings. They were sent to an apartment address listed for Chakrabarti in the Greenwich Village area of Manhattan.

In 2017, Brand New Congress PAC transferred another $240,000 to Brand New Congress LLC, also for "strategic consulting." Another PAC co-founded by Chakrabarti that year, Justice Democrats, transferred an additional $605,000 to Brand New Congress LLC in 2017.

Brand New Congress LLC does not appear to be registered in any state, according to state government records available online.[9]

References