World Health Organization

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The emblem of the WHO.
The World Health Organization (WHO) is program of the United Nations (UN) and the directing and coordinating authority for health within the UN system. It is responsible for "providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends."[1]

When diplomats met to form the UN in 1945, one of the issues they addressed was the establishment of a global health organization. The WHO came into existence on April 7, 1948. April 7 is celebrated annually as World Health Day.

As of 2019 Tad Adhanom was leading the organization. Adhanom was a leader in Ethiopia's Tigray People's Liberation Front, a wing of the ruling Marxist Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front. Adhanom served the repressive regime as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2012 to 2016 after a stint as Health Minister.

Dr. Margaret Chan was the Director-General of the WHO in 2006.[2]

Criticism

Neil Seeman, the director of the Canadian Statistical Assessment Service, said May 3, 2003, "Just because a study or pronouncement carries the imprimatur of the WHO should not mean it is sacrosanct," about the WHO.[3] Philip Stevens wrote in December 2005, "[t]he World Health Organization is increasingly working against American values and the interests of the poor, [and] the U.S. should seriously consider cutting back the funds until the WHO adopts a more practical outlook."[4]

WHO, along with the ACLU, Democratic Socialists of America, and the far left Human Rights Watch supports decriminalization of prostitution.[5]

Peter Humphrey, a British investigator who was jailed in China in 2013 had been drugged, chained to a chair, locked in a cage and made to read out a statement written by the police in front of cameras.[6] The anchor who presented the footage, James Chao, is now a goodwill ambassador with the World Health Organization.

Accounting fraud

The World Health Organization is horribly corrupt. An audit revealed there has been a surge in internal corruption allegations across the whole of the organization with the detection of multiple schemes aimed at defrauding large sums of money from the international body, overwhelming an internal team of full-time investigators. An Associated Press expose in 2017 found that nearly half of the WHO two billion dollar budget went to first-class airfare and five-star hotels, more than its entire budget to combat the AIDS virus. The United States is the largest contributor US taxpayers fund about a quarter of the WHO budget.

Population control in Kenya

Bill Gates committed $10 Billion to the World Health Organization to help usher in “the decade of vaccines.” The Kenya Catholic Doctors Association accused WHO and UNICEF of putting an antigen into vaccines causing miscarriages in 2014, which resulted in 2.3 million women and girls receiving the questionable inoculation.

“We sent six samples from around Kenya to laboratories in South Africa. They tested positive for the HCG antigen,” said Dr. Muhame Ngare of the Mercy Medical Centre in Nairobi to LifeSiteNews. “They were all laced with HCG.”

Dr. Ngare blew the whistle about WHO’s population control agenda in the third-world, which was allegedly pushed under the guise of providing tetanus vaccinations.

“This proved right our worst fears; that this WHO campaign is not about eradicating neonatal tetanus but a well-coordinated forceful population control mass sterilization exercise using a proven fertility regulating vaccine. This evidence was presented to the Ministry of Health before the third round of immunization but was ignored,” said Dr. Ngare, who serves as the spokesman for the Kenya Catholic Doctors Association.[7]

2019 Coronavirus outbreak

The WHO, headed by a Marxist fellow traveller, publicly announced that the Wuhan virus posed no threat of contagious reaction between humans.[8]
See also: CCP global pandemic

Tadros Adhanom was the director-general of the WHO at the time of the CCP virus pandemic. Adhanom was a leader in Ethiopia's Tigray People's Liberation Front, a wing of the ruling Marxist Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front. Adhanom served the repressive regime as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2012 to 2016 after a stint as Health Minister. As a candidate for the top post, The New York Timers accused Tad Adhanom of covering up at least three epidemics.[9] Adhanom was elected WHO director-general with the Chinese Communist Party's support. One of Adhanom's first actions as director-general was to name the repressive Marxist-Leninist dictator Robert Mugabe as a WHO Goowill Ambassador.[10]

Tad Adhanom criticized travel bans to and from China where the deadly outbreak first occurred saying, "There is no reason for measures that unnecessarily interfere with international travel and trade." The WHO was not allowed into China by the Marxist regime until February 10, 2020, more than two months after the virus was first discovered.

Adhanom praised the Chinese Communist Party's response: "We appreciate the seriousness with which China is taking this outbreak, especially the commitment from top leadership and the transparency they have demonstrated," and "China is actually setting a new standard for outbreak response." Film clips of Adhanom were shown on Chinese television saying, "China took action massively at the epicenter at the source of the outbreak. This is heroic. The actions of China is making us safer."

For whatever reason the WHO misinformed the planet about the pandemic, the simple fact remains that the WHO did not apply science or the scientific method to determine the gravity of the outbreak, but rather took on faith the word of a totalitarian regime notorious for human rights abuses and held to that position for months.

The WHO is working with Google to ensure that people get information from the UN health agency first when they search for information about the virus.

External links

References